Fan or Follower of Christ By Michaelle Bragassa-Holman {Guest Article}

Fan or Follower of Christ By Michaelle Bragassa-Holman What is a Christian? Does it simply mean that you believe in God? Do you make it a point to go to church on a Sunday morning? Do you take the time to pray at some point during the day? The word Christian in our modern society…



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Sunflower Faith

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Flea treatments: What's fine for dogs isn't for cats

Flea treatments: What's fine for dogs isn't for cats
When the owners spotted fleas on their two cats, they put “just a drop” of topical flea treatment on each one. Within hours the cats were very sick, and one of them was convulsing. The family rushed them to the nearest veterinary clinic, but both cats
Read more on MPNnow.com

Lafourche Parish school battles flea infestation
Because only a few students have been affected by the flea bites, Long has not advised parents to keep their students out of school, he said. While some parents have kept their kids home due to the infestation, Long said he does not know exactly how many.
Read more on NOLA.com

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Celebrity Dog Walk Auction Benefits Battersea Dogs and Cats Home

Fans of Fidos and famous faces have the chance to make great strides toward creating a better tomorrow for pets in need by bidding on the opportunity to enjoy a canine constitutional  with a…



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DogTipper

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Halloween Safety and your Pets

Halloween is upon us! It is a fun holiday to dress up, eat too much candy, and even get your pet involved! (I myself have a chihuahua who has a bat and pumpkin costume, and my dear Lucy Goo is a witchy!)  However, there are some precautions to take when Halloween comes around that will make the holiday a pleasant experience and could even save your pet’s life.
Keep the candy bowls out of reach. It’s that simple. And if you have a cat along with a dog, keep the candy in a container with a lid.  Cats have been known to knock candy bowls off of counters and we all know who is waiting to eat everything off the floor…our canine ‘vacuums’.
There are many reasons for keeping the candy bowl away from your pets. Although cats are usually unlikely to eat the sweets, they are attracted to the wrappers- especially wrappers that are curly and crunchy. These can cause terrible bowel obstructions, and of course your cat can choke on them, too. Keep the temptation of the candy wrapper away and instead give kitty a healthy treat or ‘crunchy’ toy.
Chocolate and dogs don’t mix. You’ve probably heard that before, and it is true. A small amount ingested can cause a bad tummy ache and a large amount can be lethal. But did you know sugarless gum and candy is extremely hazardous to dogs, too? The ingredient ‘xylitol’ is an artificial sweetener used in such things as toothpaste, mouthwash, candy, gum….and more. If you have anything ‘sugar-free’ in the house, check the ingredients. If you see xylitol among them, keep those things especially out of reach. If ingested, your dog can experience vomiting, seizures, possible liver failure, and even death.
My pets love dressing up in costumes, it’s their thing.  I think they think they are little human children, the way they prance around when I put a costume on them! But, not all pets like being dressed up. If your pet is uncomfortable wearing clothes, give them a break and lay off the dressing up. There’s no need to agonize your pet by dressing him or her up- and pets that are unhappy in clothes will try and get them off. This can be dangerous- potential strangling and blockages due to ingestion of clothes.  If you’re aiming for a cute pic, take a regular shot of your dog or cat and photo shop in a cute holiday background or costume. If you really want that picture of Fido and Fluffy dressed as Batman and Robin, though, then be sure the stage is set, put on their costumes, take the pic quickly, then take the costumes off, and treat them up with a healthy pet snack!
Have a plan for how to handle your pets the day of Halloween. If you have cats who try to bolt out the front door, keep them in a separate room while the trick-or-treaters are coming. Keep dogs in another room, or behind a baby gate. You don’t want the chance of your dog escaping, a child feeding her candy, or any nipping due to the excitement.  The sweetest dog can get snappy if she experiences anxiety, fright, and gets scared. The safest thing to do is to keep pets far away from the door. If you have a dog that gets anxious when she hears the doorbell ring, make a plan for your dog to be at a quiet place- with a friend, relative, or pet sitter-somewhere away from your house that is soothing and quiet.
One last note. And I find it a sad thing to even have to mention- but if you have an outdoor black cat, please keep kitty inside during Halloween. Black cats are as sweet as any other kind of cat. In fact, I grew up with one, and she had the coolest purr- she was a little motor box, and my best friend. But, unfortunately, black cats are often the victims of horrific acts of violence during the Halloween holiday.  Keep them safe and keep them inside.
Have a Happy ‘Howlween’!
By Nicole Bruder, owner of Lucy Goo Pet Sitting
www.lucygoopetsitting,com


PetsitUSA Blog

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What Does Appropriate Dog Play Look Like?

Watching a variety of different dogs play is one of the biggest benefits of my part-time job. Dogs really know how to party, and the joy they get from play can be contagious:

Mini-breaks and Time-outs

In this video you several breaks in the action, even in just under a minute of elapsed time. This is a good thing. I highlighted the big one in the video, and there was another right after I stop filming (naturally) where Caffeine was gagging (it happens during allergy season and no, it’s not the collar) and Buddha politely stopped and waited for her to reach up and mouth him to resume play. I really wish I hadn’t stopped filming!

This kind of cooperation is what we want to see. It doesn’t always look exactly like this of course, because all dogs are different and play differently. It’s possible to draw broad generalizations about breeds – retrievers tend to like to mouth wrestle and end up with their heads literally soaked, bully breeds tend to slam dance, some herding breeds like to play tag — however the "tagging" better be gentle — but as I’ve said before, these are broad generalizations and are not always true. Know your dog, and know your dog’s friends.

Symmetry and Handicapping

Patricia McConnell talks about self-handicapping frequently on her blog and in her talks. It’s an important part of play. In the video I highlight a point where Buddha offers to let Caffeine pounce on him for a bit. She rarely takes him up on this offer. She likes to play on the floor and even did that when we had a much larger dog that played much more roughly with her.

In the puppy playgroups at Kellar’s Canine Academy we have a "regular" named Lucy, a 8 month old or so Pit Bull mix, who is an absolute master at self-handicapping. She can switch from letting a tiny puppy half her size jump on her and nibble her face to slam-dancing with her best friend, a 70 pound Rottweiler puppy, in seconds.

Some dogs can adjust play styles. I’m fortunate that Buddha and Caffeine (with the few dogs she will play with) can and will do this. It’s not necessarily common and don’t expect your dog or the dogs you come across to do so. Some dogs take offense, even in the middle of a play session, to a bitten ear or a jumped-upon face. The question is, how do they react? A warning and/or disengaging from play is just fine. Retaliation is usually not.

In a safe environment dogs always have the option to end play by stopping and, if nexessary, leaving the area. This means (at least) two things must be true: the area is big enough for a dog to be able to leave the area of play and the participants are in control to take the hint when a dog wants a break.

So What’s Actually Acceptable?

This is an excellent video, worth watching a few times, about play and body language:

One of the more interesting parts of my apprenticeship was watching how different trainers handled playgroups in both puppy classes and with adult dogs. Some were very hands on and quick to enforce a break in the action. Other tending to go with the flow and tried to engineer things more by strategically picking playgroups.

I came away a bit of a laissez faire attitude, and the fact that I have had to deal with small groups and then ideal facilities (until very recently) have forced me to improvise. I want to see regular breaks in the action. I don’t like to see too many high-speed chases, dogs up on their hind legs, and dogs that seem overwhelmed or afraid need to be helped by pairing them up with appropriate playmates. But attempts to support one dog or another or to enforce specific rules of play are not my thing.

What has your experience with playgroups been?

What Does Appropriate Dog Play Look Like? is a post written by . You can see the actual post at Dog Training in Bergen County New Jersey


Dog Spelled Forward Website and Blog

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What are the symptoms of yeast infection and how do you cure it?

Question by DropOfScye: What are the symptoms of yeast infection and how do you cure it?
What do you get yeast infection from? I’ve never had any kind of sex but I think I might have yeast infection :S Are there simple over-the-counter medicines you can buy without a prescription to treat it? How do they usually work?

Best answer:

Answer by taylorcullenforever
You can get a yeast infection from being too moist down there or leaving wet clothing on too long. It really just depends. But you don’t have to be sexually active to get one.

You can actually find Monistat yeast cream in the female isle–where tampons and pads and condoms are–and you dont have to have an adult or a prescription to get them. They are very easy to get.

There is a 1, 3, and 7 day treatment. I like 3 the best, but sometimes 7 works better.

They work by putting a cream inside you with a applicator and it works to get rid of the yeast.

It’s under 20 dollars. If you have any more questions: contact me at: mrs.dontmesswitme@yahoo.com

What do you think? Answer below!

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Training Your Dog

No dog is born with good manners, nor are humans. When training your dog the most important thing you need to teach it is to let you know when it has to go to the bathroom.

Are you tired of your new puppy pooping on your carpet, leaping up on the laps of your guests, pulling so hard on its leash that you feel your arm is going to be pulled out of the socket? This is not fun, but it is SOP (standard operating procedure) for a dog. If you want your pet to act civilly when guests are around and not create chaos in your life at other times, you’ll need to train your puppy or adult dog if you expect it to be pleasant to live with.

Not training your dog has about the same results as never sending your child to school and expecting him to graduate from college summa cum laude.

Training is the best gift you can ever give your puppy or young adult dog. It’s a great way to develop a lifetime bond with your dog. Friendly, house trained, well-behaved dogs make better companions and are less likely to end up in an animal shelter when an owner can no longer handle its antics and bad behavior.

We all remember the old saying “You can’t teach an old dog new tricks”. This is nothing more than an old aphorism passed down through generations. More often than not, it is actually referring to humans and their stubbornness in learning something new or changing their ways. In actuality, there are no age limits to teaching dogs. Puppies as young as three weeks old can learn correct behavior and so can adult dogs of any age.

But here’s the most critical part of training – the buck starts with you!

When training your dog it doesn’t matter whether you have a new puppy or a senior dog; the first step is learning how to be a good teacher to your dog.

    Guidelines for dog training

No matter what you’re trying to teach your dog, whether it’s house training or commands like “sit” or “stay”, there are a few basic guidelines that will help make the whole teaching and learning process easier for both you and your pet.

Be consistent
Always use the same signal and tone of voice for a command when training your dog. If you say “come” one day, then “come here” another day, and “come here, now” a different day, you’ll do nothing but confuse your dog. If you allow your dog to yank on its leash sometimes, but you jerk it by the collar when it pulls you other times, you’ll also confuse it. It’s important that everyone who will be issuing commands to your dog uses the same rules and signals.

Use praise and rewards
Almost all dog trainers believe that dogs learn better and faster when they are praised and rewarded for getting it right, instead of punishing them when they get it wrong.

The best motivator is usually a combination of a small food treat and enthusiastic praise. Too many people forego the doggy treat because they worry they’ll end up with a dog who’ll only behave when it’s rewarded with food. Once your dog gets the idea of what you want, you can begin cutting down on the treats and eventually phase them out entirely.

If your dog isn’t that interested in doggy treats (try finding one who isn’t!) you can reward it with a physical incentive like a good tummy rub.

Time the rewards right
The praise and reward need to come immediately after your dog does what you want, otherwise it will not understand the connection between the action and the reward.

Keep it short and sweet
Training always works best if it’s fun for your dog and you keep the training period short so neither of you gets bored or frustrated. Try starting with 5-10 minutes a day, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies have shorter attention spans than older dogs. And don’t act like a drill-sergeant unless you’re training guard dogs.

Make it easy for your dog to get it right
If you attempt to train your puppy or dog in a dog park with dozens of interesting distractions, you’re going to be behind the eight ball and probably will never succeed at proper training. You need to train your pet slowly, starting in a quiet, familiar place with no distractions. After it has mastered some simple commands you can begin making the training more challenging for your dog. Don’t move on to the next step until your dog has mastered the current one.

Keep your cool
Yelling, hitting, and jerking your dog around by a leash won’t teach it how to sit on command, go outside when it needs to urinate, or do anything else you want it to learn. Calm, consistent training is the best way to get your dog to obey and respect you.

Don’t expect that once your dog has learned something, it’s ingrained for life. Your dog can lose its new skills if you don’t continue with regular practice of the commands you’ve taught.

Every dog is different and will respond better to different training styles. Some dogs are so sensitive that a sharp tone of voice can rattle them; they need calm, quiet guidance. Others may be slower to learn and need lots of repetition before they get all the rules down pat. Some dogs will occasionally push back when you push them, rather than give in to what you’re asking for.

Your dog’s behavior, not its breed, is the best indicator of its personality. Yelling, hitting, and other practices that cause pain or fear are never the solution for any dog’s misbehavior. These actions can create a behavior problem where none existed, or make an existing problem worse.

The bottom line in training your dog is the investment of your time to turn your relationship with your pet into a win-win situation. Do your homework first to learn how to communicate what you want in a way that your dog will understand. Be consistent and patient, and always reward your dog for getting it right.

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Three things to know about the jerky illnesses

Let’s imagine, for a moment, that there is a serial killer loose in your town. One by one, he picks little kids off from the local playground, and it’s horrible and awful. The police are working around the clock, but the killer remains elusive.

But he only ever chooses his victims from that one playground.

You wouldn’t take your kids there, right? Even if *most* of the kids who play there end up ok, even if the police chief says, well, it might be OK now? Why take that chance, when there are plenty of safe alternatives?

That’s kind of how I feel about this jerky thing. From the latest FDA update:

The agency has repeatedly issued alerts to consumers about reports it has received concerning jerky pet treat-related illnesses involving 3,600 dogs and 10 cats in the U.S. since 2007. Approximately 580 of those pets have died.

Since 2007, guys. Keep in mind that the FDA is usually all over dog foods when there is potential human illness involved as well, but the wheels turn a little more slowly when there is no indication people are also getting sick. Regardless, I’m glad they are becoming involved- and the level in which they are asking for veterinarians and consumers to participate is much higher than I’ve seen before- but there’s no indication when we might have some answers.

jerky

There’s really only three things I’m reminding people of here:

1. It’s not just chicken

Everyone keeps focusing on chicken jerky as the culprit, but some sickened dogs have eaten duck, fruit, or sweet potato jerkies as well. Most of the treats have come from China (they aren’t saying it outright in the fact sheet, but we can read between the lines here.)

2. The symptoms are diffuse

Not every dog has the same symptoms. Some have GI signs, some have liver issues, others have renal disease. There may be one cause but it is possible we are dealing with multiple contaminants, drugs, or toxins. Which is really frightening.

3. This is 100% entirely preventable

Now that we know it’s a problem, there’s an easy solution. Don’t feed jerky treats from China. They are not a necessary part of anyone’s daily nutrition. It won’t find the culprit, but it will keep your pet safe until they do. Here are some alternatives:

  • Make your own. No special equipment required.
  • Use fresh alternatives like baby carrots or apples
  • Become obsessive about label-reading. Even some products that appear to be from the US or distributed from the US have ingredients made in China. If you’re not sure, don’t buy it.

I made this video almost two years ago, and we STILL don’t know what is going on with those jerky treats.

Click here to view the embedded video.

 

Do you know anyone whose pet was sickened from jerky?

Pawcurious: With Pet Lifestyle Expert and Veterinarian Dr. V.

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How to beat 6 everyday infection spreaders

How to beat 6 everyday infection spreaders
Think of MRSA as staph on steroids—it's resistant to most antibiotics and can be deadly if it enters the bloodstream. And even though MRSA usually hides in hospitals, at least 12 percent of the infections in 2005 occurred in the general community
Read more on Fox News

Glowing Antibiotics Reveal Bacterial Infections
Lead author Marleen van Oosten, a microbiologist at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands, says that the only way to distinguish normal post-surgical swelling from an infection at an implant site is to perform a biopsy on the affected tissue
Read more on Scientific American

Mutant protein blocks HIV infection
Scientists from the University of Cambridge in the UK have discovered a mutant form of an immune protein is able to block infection and spread of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in immune cells. Their findings could lead to new ways to fight HIV
Read more on Medical News Today

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Chronic Medical Conditions in Pets Often Improve With a Better Diet!

The incidence of chronic medical conditions, obesity, and diabetes is soaring in dogs, cats, and people. The reasons are very similar in all three species. Many of us and our pets share high carbohydrate diets and low activity levels.

Some dogs and cats may look and feel better with fewer carbohydrates or moister food (reduced calories). Their coats may look better with healthier oils and protein in the diet(fish, olive, canola, coconut, eggs, sardines). Less carbohydrates, healthier oils, better proteins, and less allergens may help prevent many chronic medical problems. (obesity, diabetes,  ear and skin problems, diarrhea,bladder crystals and stones, , and seizures)

Here are some reasons people should consider a different or more varied diet for their pets.  

1.Variation in the diet helps supply needed combinations of proteins, fats, vitamins, and minerals.Would you trust the mix of ingredients from one source in your “human kibble”?

2. Some dogs and cats do not tolerate the high level of carbohydrates that may lead to obesity and early arthritis, diabetes, or the lack of moisture that can lead to the formation of crystals in the urine, bladder infections, and then bladder stones. Moister, lower carbohydrate food may be better for some dogs and cats.

3. Commercial dry food diets (even some prescription diets!) often contain known allergens and are low in healthy fats and oils that nourish the skin. 30% of my day is spent treating dogs and cats with dry skin, itch skin,  or chronic skin and ear problems that may often be due to their diet.

4.Cats suffer from urinary tract issues because they just don’t drink enough to dilute out the minerals in the dry food. Many vets are recommending canned food for cats.I feed my cats (obligate carnivores) canned food and cooked or raw meat two-three times weekly

5. Some commercial dry food may not contain the optimum mix of nutrients present in the original diet of dogs and cats. There is more moisture, meat, and healthy fats and oils in prey. Some dogs and cats may look and feel better when fed a different dry food, canned food, healthy human food, raw food, healthy oils, or vitamin/mineral/omega/glucosamine-chondroitin  supplements. If your dog or cat is suffering chronic medical problems…consider changing the type of food instead of trying another medical procedure, pill, ointment, or shampoo

6. Dogs and cats are individuals. Their genetics and physiology are different. They each may need slightly different types of food or ingredients to thrive. Could we all eat the basic formula in a “human kibble”  Some humans would gain weight. lose weight, or react to an ingredient. 

Dogs and cats are individuals too and may need a different formula(wet, dry, raw, more oils, home cooked, adding healthy human food)

That’s why I wrote Dog Dish Diet and Feed Your Pet to Avoid the Vet!  To help pet owners become part of the health care team and treat chronic medical conditions with a different commercial food, home cooked food , and the right human food and treats!

http://dogdishdiet.com/order-now

Dr. Greg’s Dog Dish Diet

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