What is Gobi?

This little dog was discovered in the Gobi desert in China on 155-mile race.

The thinking that this dog is a “chihuahua cross” is a bit wrong, I think. I think she’s something a bit more special than that.

I think she is a landrace East Asian toy dog, the ancestral form that leads to the Pekingese, the original pug, the Japanese chin, and other dogs of this type.

I don’t there are many chihuahuas in the Gobi Desert, and she certainly should have her DNA tested.


Natural History

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Students buy their teacher a puppy after his beloved dog dies

The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

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Irie and Tiki Enjoy a Taste of Iceland #IcelandicPlusDogs

This post is sponsored by Icelandic+™ and the BlogPaws® Pet Influencer Network™. I am being compensated to help share information about Icelandic+™ and their all-natural dog chews and treats, but…



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DogTipper

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I believe this project actually helps educate peop…

I believe this project actually helps educate people on both pitbulls and "wolfdogs" by reducing overbreeding and showing how wonderful blockheads can be as mentor dogs. Good work.
BAD RAP Blog

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Congress could end red wolf recovery

Canis rufus

It should be noted that the bulk of the genomic data show that the creature called a “red wolf” is actually a hybrid between some now extinct population of wolves and coyotes. Indeed, the most in depth genome comparison study performed on wolves and coyotes not only revealed that “red” and “Eastern” wolves are hybrids, it also revealed that coyotes were recent derivatives from Eurasian wolves and not ancient North American jackals.  Thus, the whole population of wild Canis in North America is much more closely related than we assumed.

Most of the data supporting the red wolf’s validity as a species are based upon fossil and subfossil evidence, which tended to show that the creatures being bred for introduction in the wild look an awful lot like ancient North American wolves.

But it now seems that the animals running loose in North Carolina are actually wolves with lots of coyote ancestry.

That’s what the science is telling us, and as I noted back in 2011, when this evidence from genome-wide analyses was being published, that it wouldn’t be long before politicians noticed a problem and began to use red wolves to chip away at the ESA.

I support the ESA, but I’ve long thought that adhering to red and Eastern wolf paradigms could cause real problems with the act’s long-term viability.

I recently had the pleasure of reading Nate Blakeslee’s American Wolf, which is a biography of a Yellowstone wolf named “O-Six.”  O-Six was the breeding female of the Lamar Valley pack, a wolf widely photographed in the park. She was a great elk hunter and mother, and because she was so well-known in the park, she became a sort of celebrity.

O-Six died from a hunter’s bullet, and her death never would have happened had the Democratic-controlled Senate not allowed a provision in a government funding bill to pass, which overturned a federal judge’s ruling that stopped a proposal that would have allowed Idaho, Montana, and Wyoming to regulate wolves as a state matter.  It was allowed to pass in order to provide immunity to Montana’s incumbent Democratic Senator, Jon Tester, who was facing a tough re-election.

This political drama is carefully described in Blakeslee’s work, and although little was made of it at the time, this provision was the first time congress had intervened on ESA listing in this manner.

Flash forward to 2017, and it looks like the Republican-controlled congress is about to do the something similar to red wolves. Senator Lisa Murkowski has introduced a provision the bill funding the interior department that declares the red wolf extinct in the wild and cuts all funding for its recovery.

This is problematic on many fronts.

First of all, the Endangered Species Act was designed to use scientific evidence for listing and recovery efforts. For most of its existence, the US Fish and Wildlife Service has been left to use science for these efforts, but now congress has begun to intervene to affect endangered species policy citing political concerns only.

Part of the reason why congress is doing such a thing is that the US Fish and Wildlife service has pretty much been impervious to the growing data on what red wolves actually are. The bureaucracy still maintains Canis rufus as a species, but the evidence that it is a recently derived hybrid between the wolf and the coyote is pretty hard to ignore.

Whenever I’ve pointed out these problems, I’ve been called a wolf-hater and a right-winger and a Republican. I’m none of the three.

The problem is that wolves are political symbols.  Every wildlife conservation organization in the country uses wolves for fundraising. Wolves have two things going for them: they are the wild ancestors of dogs and they tend to recovery fairly quickly when not persecuted.  It is easy to turn the wolf into sort of the canine equivalent of the noble savage, a dog that lives in nature, wild and free, and with greater wisdom and intelligence than any mere cur of the street.

To others, the wolf is the federal government coming for your hunting rights, your farming enterprises, and your guns.

So we now have this dynamic in which our political issues with each other are being meted out over an animal.

This says much more about us than it does the actual biology of wolves and coyotes. We are fractious. We are at war with each other.

The romantic notions of a unique Southern wolf species has been racked convincing in depth genomic data that show it is hybrid have come to pass just at the same time that a resurgent right wing has taken over the US government at all three branches. This is a perfect storm for disaster for the Endangered Species Act.

Until the Republican majorities in congress are reduced significantly, the red wolf will ultimately be used to undermine the act.

It is a very sad state of affairs, but the US Fish and Wildlife Service clearly did a lot to anger sportsmen in Eastern North Carolina, as this thread clearly shows, and the Endangered Species Act will not last if this sort of implementation is ever repeated again.

No real solution for this problem exists. I would put money on the red wolf being delisted. I should be glad that the ESA has gone onto preserve other predators, like the Mexican wolf and Florida panther, but because it is happening in this fashion, it could be a real disaster.

And all because of this wolf, not a real species at all, but one in which many lines of nonsense on both sides have been written.

 

 

 

 

 


Natural History

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Friday Funny: Dogs on Trains (Much Better than Snakes on Planes)

Must have been traveling first class! Happy Friday! Until next time, Good day, and good dog!


Doggies.com Dog Blog

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Instagram Cats, Olive and Rye (and Fig), Review Halo Cat Food

Olive & Rye are two female cats rescued by Philly PAWS in 2014 and adopted by Laura S. Kicey, an artist and photographer who have almost 100,000 Instagram followers. Olive is a loopy calico who is about 3 years old. Rye is about 2 years old and brimming with copious “tortitude.” Newest addition to the family is a sweet girl named Fig. The trio sampled Halo Holistic Chicken & Chicken Liver Recipe and here’s their video review:

“…Even though Olive was being a bit shy about eating around the #tortievortex, she especially appreciated the tiny kibble size as she isn’t a kibble cruncher, she is more of a swallower of whole bits. We always appreciate grain free food as Rye’s tummy is a bit sensitive to such things! And as promised our poop smell didn’t quite as bad. Thank you for your generosity Halo Pets!”

Olive & Rye are two female cats rescued by Philly PAWS in 2014 and adopted by Laura S. Kicey, an artist and photographer who have almost 100,000 Instagram followers. Olive is a loopy calico who is about 3 years old. Rye is about 2 years old and brimming with copious “tortitude.” Newest addition to the family is a sweet girl named Fig. The trio sampled Halo Holistic Chicken & Chicken Liver Recipe and here’s their video review:

“…Even though Olive was being a bit shy about eating around the #tortievortex, she especially appreciated the tiny kibble size as she isn’t a kibble cruncher, she is more of a swallower of whole bits. We always appreciate grain free food as Rye’s tummy is a bit sensitive to such things! And as promised our poop smell didn’t quite as bad. Thank you for your generosity Halo Pets!”

Thank you Laura, Olive, Rye and Fig for reviewing our Halo cat food.

Follow @OliveandRye on Instagram.

Halo Pets

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Get Holiday-Ready with molly mutt! #giveaway

The countdown is on to the holidays and, like many pet parents, we’re preparing our home for holiday company. We’ve been making our (cleaning) list and checking it twice–and one of…



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DogTipper

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Miranda Lambert Invites Dog Lovers to Become MuttNation Citizens

Soon to hit the road on her 2018 “Livin’ Like Hippies” tour, throughout 2017 country music superstar Miranda Lambert continued to put homeless companion animals on the road to a…



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DogTipper

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Words and phrases that I would like to see banned

The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

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