Kennel Cough in Dogs


Kennel cough in dogs is a fairly easy ailment to diagnose at home. If your dog suddenly develops a ‘hacking’ cough or constantly sounds like it’s choking on something, it could be kennel cough, known to your vet as canine infectious tracheobronchitis.

These coughing sounds can be frightening, leading you to believe something is seriously wrong with your dog; but most of the time kennel cough is not a serious condition and dogs usually recover from it without needing to undergo any treatment.

Dogs develop kennel cough if they inhale bacteria or virus particles into their respiratory tract. A dog’s respiratory tract is lined with a coating of mucus to trap infectious particles. However, there are some conditions that can weaken a dog’s natural protection mechanism and make it susceptible to kennel cough infection, and the result is an inflammation of the larynx (voice box) and trachea (windpipe).

Several conditions that can lead to kennel cough in dogs include exposure to poorly ventilated or overcrowded rooms and holding areas in kennels and animal shelters; overexposure to cold temperatures; and repeated exposure to dust or smoke from cigarettes.

Kennel cough can have multiple causes and is by no means limited specifically to the conditions listed above. One of the most common reasons for a dog to develop a case of kennel cough is a bacteria called Bordetella bronchiseptica. Most dogs that are infected with this bacteria will also become infected with a virus at the same time. Canine adenovirus, canine herpes virus, canine distemper virus, and parainfluenza virus are among these diseases, and they are more serious than kennel cough alone.

If your dog continues to have a persistent, forceful cough, listen carefully to determine if it sounds very different from the cough-like sound made by many dogs which is referred to as a “reverse sneeze.” Reverse sneezes are normal in certain dogs and breeds, and is usually caused by post-nasal drip or a slight irritation in the dog’s throat. If your dog displays other symptoms including sneezing, a runny nose, or eye discharge, you’ll probably want to have your vet check the dog to be sure the symptoms are not indicative of kennel cough or one of the viruses.

Kennel cough in dogs is a very contagious disease and a dog who has come down with it should not be allowed around other healthy dogs.

Most cases of kennel cough will resolve themselves without any kind of treatment, but medications can help speed the dog’s recovery and help minimize symptoms during the infection. Most dogs will recover completely within three weeks, but older dogs or dogs with certain medical conditions can take up to six weeks to fully recover.

A serious case of kennel cough in dogs can lead to pneumonia so it’s wise to follow up with your vet if your dog doesn’t improve within this short period of time. Also, if your dog begins breathing rapidly or acts listless it could be signs of a more serious condition

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Scenes from the Roadside 5

Yesterday was the 5 month anniversary of the west coast walk & thought I’d celebrate it with some of the as yet unseen pics – some stunning, some curious and kooky, some downright inexplicable and the rest creepy.  

From today near San Gregorio – yet another dismembered doll which calls into question the sanity of these folks
Tenting amongst moss.  

I dunno but imagine seeing this from a sidewalk in Daly City in the middle of the night.  Should’ve busted him out dammit

Ohhhh the symbolism.  There’s some crazy sh*t in San Francisco 

Uh huh.  Moving on…

Angelica doesn’t think Indy’s a boy. But does she know the glasses don’t match her ensemble?

Well we could’ve taken ‘The Unifried’ bus the rest if the way

These had to have been placed here right?  Someone’s messing w me
Moo cows on the mountainside

I poop on marlboros says this marsupial who must smoke kools 

The sea ranch chapel

West coast girls can’t hold their pee (or pickup the TP) I’ve seen this phenomenon all over in this state & nowhere else
Sleeping in the cuffy cove cemetery for Druids 

THE JOURNEY CONTINUES

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Book Review ~ The Edge of Never by J .A. Redmerski

 

Title: The Edge of Never
Publisher: Hachette Book Group
Publish Date: March 12, 2013


 


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LoveMy2Dogs

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Wallkill Mighty Mite Panthers appear on 'The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon'

Wallkill Mighty Mite Panthers appear on 'The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon'
The Wallkill Mighty Mite Panthers got a "do-over" on "The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon" Wednesday night. A video of the team went viral last week when they couldn't break a spirit banner they tried to run through. The group of 6- and 7-year-old
Read more on News 12 Westchester

Get rid of mites for allergy sufferers
Although the thought of sleeping with millions of dust mites — microscopic arachnids that feast on flakes of skin — is just plain gross, it's something most people can handle without worry. After all, our bodies are inhabited by multitudes of
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Face Mites
It should come as no surprise that we have micobes living on and in us—bacteria, fungi, viruses, and more. But did you know that arachnids are a part of our ecosystem? According to a new study, we all have at least two species of mites living on our
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New spider mite found in Washington
A survey of spider mite populations in Washington State vineyards last year revealed that, for the most part, spider mites are not an economic problem for growers and are being controlled by beneficial arthropods. But the survey confirmed a new spider
Read more on Good Fruit Grower

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Take the puppy to the dog park, they said. It’ll be fun, they said.

Until it’s time to go home.
The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

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The midwife at the end of life

Like many of you, I’ve been mesmerized by the bravery of Brittany Maynard, a 29 year old woman who is dying of Stage IV brain cancer. After hearing the course of the disease progression from her doctors and considering what the end of her days were likely to be like, she made the incredibly difficult decision to move to Oregon, one of a handful of states in which assisted suicide is legal, and choose the day and manner in which she will die.

brittany

 

While her story is compelling and awful, it is not so surprising a concept. For veterinarians, taking part in these sorts of heavy decisions is an everyday occurrence, and to the Maynard family I say: I am so glad you have the ability to make that choice.

As I travel to Indianapolis for the annual meeting of the International Association of Animal Hospice and Palliative Care (the mouthful acronym of IAAHPC), I find myself struck by the two most common things clients say to me when I come to their home to euthanize a sick pet:

  1. This must be so hard.
  2. I wish we had this for people.

Though we all wish for ourselves, and our pets, to die peacefully and unaware in our sleep, the truth is, that doesn’t always happen. Sometimes death is peaceful, but sometimes it is horrible and painful and agonizing and drawn-out. To say that is a fate worse than death is not a metaphor in this case. Death can be a relief. We don’t always get to choose the way in which we die, but when we know it is coming and it is going to be unpleasant, I am very grateful this is an option we have for our pets, and for some people.

I suppose in many ways veterinarians are leading the charge in normalizing people’s attitudes about this possibility, right in there with hospice workers and other professionals who deal with these realities. None of us probably gave that much thought when we signed the dotted line on vet school admission forms, but it’s there nonetheless.

There is a small but important distinction I wish more people made when talking about Brittany’s situation: they say, “She is choosing to die.”

This is not true. She wants very much to live. She has no choice in the matter. She is dying.

The accurate statement is, “She is choosing how to die,” and that is a vital distinction. I’ve seen differing views on this, people who genuinely believe that there is beauty in every moment of life, even in suffering an agonizing death with a ravaged body, and to that I simply say: I respect your view on it and your right to choose that end. I also respect those who choose as Brittany is doing, and I find beauty in that as well.

There are limits, of course. I do not show up at people’s homes and simply provide euthanasia on demand for pets who do not have a terminal disease. For my own emotional well-being I have very specific requirements and lines I do not cross. There are situations (such as a dangerously aggressive pet) where the lines about what is ethically acceptable are fuzzy, but my personal limits are not. I feel very proud and honored to be able to do what I do.

This is how I continue to do this every day: by reminding myself and the grieving owners that we are not killing a pet; the disease is killing him or her. We are simply aiding the process and making it more comfortable. I wish for the Maynards the same I do for my patients: comfort, peace, as much as can be gathered in a stressful situation.

I am the midwife at the end of life.

And I am OK with that.

Pawcurious: With Pet Lifestyle Expert and Veterinarian Dr. V.

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Tool Ticks and Leeches

The song Ticks and Leeches by Tool Album: Lateralus track number 8 Lyrics Suck and suck. suckin up all you can suckin up all you can suck. Workin up under my…

A neglected dog was kept in the same infested spot for weeks. It’s covered in Rhipicephalus sanguineus, the brown dog tick. Each ear alone carries hundreds. …
Video Rating: 3 / 5

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“If We Win, He’s Buying Me a Puppy!”

Katie Castan, who was holding the now famous sign at the Wild Card Game last week — “IF WE WIN, HE’ S BUYING ME A PUPPY!” — and boyfriend Joe Onofrio adopted a 4-year-old Pembroke Welsh Corgi last weekend to seal the deal. The dog’s name is Lucy, but her middle name is Rally, as the way the Royals rallied to win the game and sweep the American League Division Series. After the game many…
The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

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THE PETCO FOUNDATION HOLIDAY WISHES ARE BACK!

HW_Banner1

The Petco Foundation in partnership with Halo, Purely for Pets, announced its second annual holiday grant campaign, Holiday Wishes, designed to help the most dedicated animal welfare organizations succeed in their mission to save pets’ lives – at the holidays, and year round.

Qualified organizations are invited to submit their most impactful success stories for a chance to receive the winning grant award of $ 100,000 or a series of finalist awards ranging from $ 5,000 to $ 50,000. All entries must be submitted by Oct. 30th.

The Holiday Wishes campaign is a way for us to make holiday wishes come true for some very deserving organizations. In addition, we hope to inspire entire communities to take action and save lives,” said Petco Foundation executive director Susanne Kogut. “Every animal should celebrate this holiday season with a family, and by sharing these stories, we hope to increase the number of animals spending this holiday season in new, loving homes.”

Read the full press release.

Halo

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How to Care For a Ferret : Pet Ferret Bathing & Flea Prevention

Watch an exotic animal health technician explain how to bathe a pet ferret, as well as how to prevent fleas, in this free online video. Expert: Sarah Tingle …

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