Ear Infections in Dogs

Chronic ear infections in dogs should be treated as soon as they are detected, because left untreated, they can result in permanent damage and hearing loss. Minor ear infections can often be treated with medication, while severe ear infections will require medical intervention by a veterinarian.

A dog’s middle and inner ear are equally susceptible to infections. The inner ear controls a dog’s sense of balance and hearing and a dog with an inner ear infection will lose its sense of balance and all or most of its hearing. If left untreated, the infection can progress to the dog’s brain and cause serious damage.

An inner ear infection in a dog is usually caused by the spread of an existing outer ear infection into the inner ear. The dark, moist environment of the inner ear can cause bacteria to multiply in the ear canal. When foreign objects or ear mites enter into a dog’s ear and the dog scratches that ear, you can almost be sure an infection will develop. Hormonal imbalances, allergies, and tumors are also known to cause ear infections. It is also possible for ear infections to be inherited from a dog’s parents and passed from generation to generation.

Dogs with droopy ears are more prone to developing ear infections than are dogs with perky, upright ears.

Symptoms of inner ear infections in dogs include:
* Odor from the ear canal
* Inflammation in the ear canal
* Violent shaking of the head
* Scratching the head and ear
* Bloody discharge from the ear
* Pain in the ear
* Drooping eyelids
* Loss of balance and coordination including circling

A veterinarian can diagnose an inner ear infection in a dog using x-rays of the head and an examination with an otoscope, an instrument incorporating a light and a magnifying lens used to examine the eardrum and the external canal of the ear.

The dog will have to be anesthetized to allow the vet to flush out the wax and other buildup within the ear before using the otoscope. If the ear drum is then found to be infected, discolored and full of fluid, a definite diagnoses of an inner ear infection is assured. The dog may not have an infection of the outer ear but if it has an inner ear infection, it will have an outer ear infection as well.

If the inner ear infection is mild it can be treated with antibiotics administered orally or by injection. Many vets will also prescribe a topical anti-fungal cream along with antibiotic ointments. For chronic or more severe infections, the middle ear has to be flushed out and then treated. It may also be necessary to cut open the ear drum to drain it of fluids.

Preventing inner ear infections requires that you feed your pet a healthy diet and see that it gets regular grooming to ward off ear infections. Early diagnosis and treatment of outer ear infections will also help prevent any inner ear infections.

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Removing Pet Odors From Your House

Removing pet odors from your house can be easy and you’ll create a healthy environment for you and your family or guests. The key to removing these odors is to first remove the source if you expect the smell to completely disappear and not have it return shortly after you’ve cleaned.

If you have a pet dog (or maybe two) you know exactly what it’s like to live with gobs of hair, a sofa and chairs that smell strange, and the ever so popular urine on your rugs and carpets.

Living with your pet day in and day out, it’s easy to get used to these odors and not even notice that sometimes your house smells like a kennel.

The first thing you’ll need to do is give your dog a bath on a regular basis. This will depend on factors like how long your dog’s coat is, whether it’s strictly an inside dog or whether it always runs around your yard, and whether you let your dog roll about in the dirt or whatever it feels like romping around in. If a dog is dirty it will spread mud or filth all over your house.

You’ll also need to be vigilant in removing excess hair from your dog and not wait until it’s all over your furniture.

Once a week remove any dog hair from your furniture using a standard vacuum cleaner with the side attachment. Just vacuum the furniture until all the hair is gone. You can also use a lint roller to pick up the loose hair.

Your floors should be cleaned at least once a week. Rugs and carpets vacuumed, and wood or tile floors swept clean before mopping. On tile or linoleum floors you can use bleach to be sure all the bacteria is killed.

Replace the air conditioning and furnace filters once a month. Loose dog hair tends to stick to filters.

Disinfecting hard surfaces that your dog comes in daily contact with will help remove any lingering odors, and by using a sanitizer you can kill more than 99% of all germs, including cold and flu viruses that may be clinging to surfaces in your home.

Standard spray air fresheners will only mask the scents in your house and you’ll end up with a dog that smells like a pet covered with flowers. Buy a spray that removes odors instead of covering them up.

You’re going to need a pet stain and odor remover if you want to get rid of all urine odors. An inexpensive and just as effective method for removing these odors is to spray the urine stained areas with a mixture of half vinegar and half water.

You should wash your pet’s bedding at least two times a month, then spray it for a fresh, clean scent.

Removing pet odors from your house doesn’t need to be a time consuming chore that you hate to face every week. Just follow the instructions above and soon your house will be free of unpleasant dog odors.

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RESCUED GREYHOUND SAVES ADOPTIVE FAMILY

clobber-lgClobberhead the greyhound was still getting used to his new family when he saved their lives.

According to Fox 59 in Indianapolis, just 8 weeks ago, Erin Cramer and her family of Shelbyville, Ind. had adopted Clobberhead from the Greyhound Pets of America.

The family fell in love with the former racing dog at first sight. “It was just one of those things where (we knew) this was our dog for sure,” Cramer told Fox News. Cramer says Clobber is a great fit for her family and was settling in nicely.

One day, however, when Cramer was home sick, Clobber started acting strangely. The normally relaxed dog was standing with his nose against the wall. Perplexed, Cramer took him outside. He immediately wanted to go back in. “He pulled me back in the house, literally, and the minute I took the leash off, he raced back up the stairs,” Cramer told Fox.


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The American farmer–the 1% who feed the 99%

Photo courtesy of Life on a Colorado Farm Today the American farmer, representing 1% of the population, grows food for the other 99% of us. Not having to produce our own food allows us to become business owners, doctors, teachers, writers, software developers, and to follow our dreams. And yet sadly there seems to be a growing disconnect between rural and urban in our country. Today many people somehow seem to think that the food…
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PET TALK: Busting common pet myths

PET TALK: Busting common pet myths
There are some fabulous ways of preventing fleas from infesting our pets and making their lives miserable. Long gone are the powders, sprays, bombs, collars and more that were needed for an assault on the pet, house and yard. A monthly pill or topical
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Safe and Cost Effective Ways to Prevent Fleas and Ticks on your Pets
NEW YORK (MainStreet) — Gone are the days when pet owners had only two choices to protect their four-legged family from fleas, ticks and other parasites. There are literally hundreds of flea and tick preventatives on the market today, but which ones
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The tenacious tick…
I am not really UTD (up to date) on any new tick prevention. I understand there is a tasty oral chew for dogs and cats that provides 12 week flea and tick protection and is available by veterinary prescription only. Bravecto *tm kills adult fleas and
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Protect your pet's health
While you should administer heartworm prevention medication year-round, it's especially vital that you give your pet a preventive when the weather gets warmer. Heartworm, a parasitic worm that lives in the heart and pulmonary arteries of an infected
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Lunch Time Fun

Jack and I had a little impromptu photo session at lunch today.

Crazy Coulee and Little Lacey

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Polo the Poodle paints a picture for purchasing

The “Paw”-casso of the doggie world, Polo the Poodle’s painting will be featured at a charity fundraiser for the Shamrock Pet Foundation in Louisville. The 18th annual Art for the Animals live and silent auction will be held on Thursday. The 6-year-old Polo has only been painting for a year, but his painting will be featured alongside nationally renowned artists. Since Poodles are retrievers, once Polo learned key commands, he could pick up the talent…
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Treated pants kill ticks

On today’s CapeCast: The right pair of pants might save you a heap of tick trouble according to Barnstable County bug guru Larry Dapsis, so we investigate th…

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Tuesday Top Ten: Cute Animal Pictures

I was going to make this just a top five, featuring the dog pictures, but some of these were just too cute, so I had to share! Thanks to my brother, Jim, for sharing. Until next time, Good day, and good dog!


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An Internet Video Helps Bust a British Teen Who Swung a Chihuahua by the Leash

Nineteen-year-old Alfie Loft will not own any animals for two years, and that’s a good thing. Last week, someone spotted Loft with three friends on the streets of Stevenage, a small town about 30 miles north of London. He was walking a Chihuahua and repeatedly lifting the dog off the ground and swinging it around by the leash, according to the BBC.

Fortunately, this is the 21st century, and the cameras aren’t actually run by Big Brother — they’re run by everyone who has a mobile phone. One such person shot a video of Loft and his friends and posted it on Facebook, asking, “I feel sick! Does anyone recognize them???? Please can everyone share this and get this bastard found!!!!!!!”

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Judge’s Hammer on English Flag by Shutterstock.

After the video went viral, someone did recognize Loft, who quickly found himself in court. Besides being restricted from owning animals (not a big loss, as he apparently doesn't own any now), he was fined £250, which will go to the dog's owner. He also has a curfew; for 12 weeks, he's required to be home between 9 p.m. and 6 a.m.

It will probably surprise no one that alcohol was involved. The four friends had just met the dog's owner while drinking at a nearby pub. When they went out to buy more alcohol, she asked them to take the dog for a walk. If this seems like a mildly questionable choice to you, you're not alone; even in the most rural, isolated places, there are usually better ways to find a reliable dog walker than randomly handing your dog over to a drunk teenager you just met.

The judge imposed the curfew on Loft in the hope that it would help curb his drinking.

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A Tiny Chihuahua on a Hill by Shutterstock.

Natasha Patel, who represented Loft in court, said that the incident started because Loft was just pulling on the leash to get the dog to walk, and accidentally lifted it off the ground.

"The people he was with began laughing at the incident and that has almost egged him on," she said. "He knows that was wrong. He doesn't remember much of what happened."

She also says that he's extremely regretful for swinging the dog.

"He's disgusted at himself, they were his own words to me," she told the Guardian. "He feels humiliated that this incident has occurred. He has also said he would like to write a letter to apologize to the owner of the dog to show that he is truly sorry. He does love dogs himself, although he doesn't own any himself."

I did a lot of really embarrassing -- and outright stupid -- things when I was a teenager, even when sober. It helps a lot when people let you know just how stupid you're being. Swinging a dog over your head obviously goes far beyond "stupid" into "abusive," but hopefully some of the shame will stick with Alfie Loft and he'll be less of a bonehead when he grows up.

Via BBC and The Guardian.

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