Flea located under toenail – Tunga penetrans

Check out these Flea Prevention images:

Flea located under toenail – Tunga penetrans
Flea Prevention

Image by Armed Forces Pest Management Board
The toe belongs to an employee of the USDA, Agricultural Research Service (ARS), who acquired the chigoe flea, Tunga penetrans L., while in Kenya doing training on a Near Infra-Red Spectroscopy (NIRS) technique to determine mosquito age and species. The employee unfortunately was wearing sandals throughout her time at the Kenya Entomological Medical Research Institute and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KEMRI/CDC) joint research laboratory. The flea was probably acquired during a weekend trip to visit friends working nearer the Ugandan border. The employee had a slightly ingrown toenail in the exact same place before the flea infested there.

The flea had to be removed by a surgeon since it was deeply imbedded under the toenail. It wasn’t possible for the employee to just dig it out herself. The attending doctors had never seen one before, and originally wanted her to just let it live out its lifecycle. However, she wasn’t wild about dropping the eggs everywhere and potentially contributing to an outbreak of chigoe fleas in Kansas. It was also becoming infected. The extracted flea was sent to the CDC in Atlanta, GA, to have the species identification confirmed.

Usually one can simply pull out/remove those fleas with forceps or squeezing, and then treat the wound to prevent secondary infection. Another Entomologist with the KEMRI/CDC lab, who had reportedly had multiple chigoe flea infestations while living in Uganda commented, "We would just pop them out and then keep it (the wound) clean."

Flea located under toenail – Tunga penetrans
Flea Prevention

Image by Armed Forces Pest Management Board
The toe belongs to an employee of the USDA, Agricultural Research Service (ARS), who acquired the chigoe flea, Tunga penetrans L., while in Kenya doing training on a Near Infra-Red Spectroscopy (NIRS) technique to determine mosquito age and species. The employee unfortunately was wearing sandals throughout her time at the Kenya Entomological Medical Research Institute and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KEMRI/CDC) joint research laboratory. The flea was probably acquired during a weekend trip to visit friends working nearer the Ugandan border. The employee had a slightly ingrown toenail in the exact same place before the flea infested there.

The flea had to be removed by a surgeon since it was deeply imbedded under the toenail. It wasn’t possible for the employee to just dig it out herself. The attending doctors had never seen one before, and originally wanted her to just let it live out its lifecycle. However, she wasn’t wild about dropping the eggs everywhere and potentially contributing to an outbreak of chigoe fleas in Kansas. It was also becoming infected. The extracted flea was sent to the CDC in Atlanta, GA, to have the species identification confirmed.

Usually one can simply pull out/remove those fleas with forceps or squeezing, and then treat the wound to prevent secondary infection. Another Entomologist with the KEMRI/CDC lab, who had reportedly had multiple chigoe flea infestations while living in Uganda commented, "We would just pop them out and then keep it (the wound) clean."

Flea located under toenail – Tunga penetrans
Flea Prevention

Image by Armed Forces Pest Management Board
The toe belongs to an employee of the USDA, Agricultural Research Service (ARS), who acquired the chigoe flea, Tunga penetrans L., while in Kenya doing training on a Near Infra-Red Spectroscopy (NIRS) technique to determine mosquito age and species. The employee unfortunately was wearing sandals throughout her time at the Kenya Entomological Medical Research Institute and U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (KEMRI/CDC) joint research laboratory. The flea was probably acquired during a weekend trip to visit friends working nearer the Ugandan border. The employee had a slightly ingrown toenail in the exact same place before the flea infested there.

The flea had to be removed by a surgeon since it was deeply imbedded under the toenail. It wasn’t possible for the employee to just dig it out herself. The attending doctors had never seen one before, and originally wanted her to just let it live out its lifecycle. However, she wasn’t wild about dropping the eggs everywhere and potentially contributing to an outbreak of chigoe fleas in Kansas. It was also becoming infected. The extracted flea was sent to the CDC in Atlanta, GA, to have the species identification confirmed.

Usually one can simply pull out/remove those fleas with forceps or squeezing, and then treat the wound to prevent secondary infection. Another Entomologist with the KEMRI/CDC lab, who had reportedly had multiple chigoe flea infestations while living in Uganda commented, "We would just pop them out and then keep it (the wound) clean."

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Smile

She’s got a smile that lights up a room.

Crazy Coulee and Little Lacey

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A Small Furry Prayer: Dog Rescue and the Meaning of Life

A Small Furry Prayer: Dog Rescue and the Meaning of Life

Steven Kotler was forty years old, single, and facing an existential crisis when he met Lila, a woman devoted to animal rescue. “Love me, love my dogs” was her rule, and Steven took it to heart. Spurred to move by a housing crisis in Los Angeles, Steven, Lila, and their eight dogs-then ten, then twenty, and then they lost count-bought a postage-stamp-size farm in Chimayo, New Mexico. A Small Furry Prayer chronicles their adventures at Rancho de Chihuahua, the sanctuary they created for their special needs pack.While dog rescue is one of the largest underground movements in America, it is also one of the least understood. An insider look at the “cult and culture” of dog rescue, A Small Furry Prayer weaves personal experience, cultural investigation, and scientific inquiry into a fast-paced, fun-filled narrative that explores what it means to devote one’s life to the furry and the four-legged. Along the way, Kotler combs through every aspect of canine-human relations, from humans’ long history with dogs through brand-new research into the neuroscience of canine companionship, in the end discovering why living in a world made of dog may be the best way to uncover the truth about what it really means to be human.

Source: A Small Furry Prayer: Dog Rescue and the Meaning of Life

FunnyDogsVideos.com

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2012 Fiat 500 Abarth: A mite fast

2012 Fiat 500 Abarth: A mite fast
It is the motorized equivalent of a little dog with a big mouth — a cute toy pup that yap-yaps at everything bigger than itself, confident that it could outrun or outmaneuver the object of its taunts. It is a confidence born of experience, possessed
Read more on Washington Post

Dust: You can't defeat it but you can control it
By DIANA MARSZALEK ~ AP This 2012 photo released by Mission: Allergy, Inc. shows a house dust mite as seen with an electron microscope, enlarged about 200 times. Experts say dust's constant accumulation has nothing to do with poor housekeeping.
Read more on Southeast Missourian

Purdue University Breeding Mite-Resistant Bees
By Network Indiana Purdue University experts say parasitic mites are going to be more populous this year because of the warmer winter and spring. Bees could be more vulnerable to mites this summer. Purdue University researchers are trying to breed bees
Read more on Indiana Public Media

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The Scruffy Little Hunter Dog: Border Terrier



The Border terrier got its name from the area called Cheviot Hills, which is actually near the border of England and Scotland. This is where these dogs were made to attack and terminate predatory foxes.

They have wiry coat that is why they normally appear as scruffy. However, this scruffiness is an attention-grabber that is why owners do not forget to hug their little ball of energy.

The following are some of the basic facts breeders would really love to know about Borders:

Category: Terrier

Living Environment: indoors (highly recommended); outdoors (fenced yard)

Coat: wiry and short; double coated

Colors: tan, red, grizzle and tan, and/or blue and tan

Height: between 11 and 16 inches

Weight: between 11 and 16 pounds

Temperament:

Naturally,

•    they are scruffy, hard and bold hunters
•    they are active as puppies but mellow down as they mature
•    they are not friendly with rabbits, rats, hamsters, and even birds
•    they are economical to feed
•    their activity die down when left alone all day as they really love to please people especially their owners

When properly trained,

•    they can get along with the household cats but not with cats in the neighborhood
•    they may even catch a burglar
•    they may lose timidity when accustomed to active environments

Breeders should note of the following health issues:

•       Canine Epileptoid Cramping Syndrome or CES, also called as “Spike’s disease”, which is a hereditary, neurological, metabolic and muscle disorder that is sometimes confused with canine epilepsy
•       Cataract, or loss of transparency of one or both lenses of the eyes
•       Cryptorchidism, wherein testicles do not descend into the scrotum
•       Deafness
•       Skin problems and a few skin allergies

Care and Exercise:

•    Their coat needs weekly brushing.
•    They should be professionally groomed at least twice a year.
•    They should bathe only when necessary since they shed little to no hair. Their physique requires a regular exercise routine which includes a daily play time while on leash.
•    They should be on leash while walking in public places because of their hunting instincts.

Origin/History:

The exact origins of Border terriers are obscure but many breeders accepted the story that the variety was developed in the Cheviot Hills area, which is near the border of Scotland and England. The Borders have been used as hunters of rabbits and hares. They can even keep up with running horses with their short yet sturdy legs. They were also used by farmers to lure predatory foxes into their dens before killing them.

They were also trained to hunt otters, marten, and even fierce badgers. Like most terriers that were once molded as hunters, they also evolved as pets and became lovely, friendly, and loyal companion dogs. They also take part in dog shows and they can easily grab their audience attention with their agility, appearance, and bright disposition.

The breed was registered by the British Kennel Club in 1920 and by the American Club ten years after.

At present, Borders are highly favored as companion dogs and pets due to their adaptability, friendliness, and winning personality. Nonetheless, they can be reliable when it comes to tracking down vermin. In fact, some of their esteemed talents include hunting, guarding the family, and performing tricks and sports that require competitive obedience.

Like most terriers, you can be rest assured to have a loyal and bright companion dogs if you give your attention and affection to a Border. You can be sure that they can definitely drive away your bore!


Welcome to The Top Dog Blog!

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Guess Who WON the Magnificent May Giveaway?!

Thanks so much to all of you who entered our May Giveaway!  I loved reading through the entries and seeing what you guys love most about this time of year. The winner was chosen via random.org, and that lucky Bubby and Bean reader is…


CONGRATULATIONS Tara!
  You the official recipient of a prize package worth over $ 250 from Jigsaw London, Sincerely, Kinsey, Little Tree, Roots and Feathers, Lolita Rose, Blissoma, GrrFeisty, Oh, Nostalgia, and Ciera Design(Tara, please contact me at bubbyandbean {at} gmail.com so we can discuss getting you your prizes!)

I’d also like to say thank you to our May sponsor for donating prizes to our biggest giveaway ever.   And if you haven’t already, don’t forget to enter our current giveaway for a chance to win a $ 75 shopping spree at Vivi Dot!

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Bubby and Bean ::: Living Creatively

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Premium Edge Cat Food Withdrawal/Possible Thiamine Deficient Premix

Rumors were swirling yesterday via Twitter regarding “possible” problems with a cat food called Premium Edge.  Those rumors reported that a Dr. Hubbard from Stone Ridge Veterinary Hospital in Rochester, NY, was looking for any other vets who might be treating cats with neurological symptoms who had eaten certain lots/dates of Premium Edge Finky Adult and Hairball products.

http://stoneridgevethosp.com/  (585) 227-4990

Susan Thixton reports that she has contacted Diamond Pet Food (manufacturer of Premium Edge) and confirmed that certain lots are being withdrawn from retail outlets.

See Susan’s blog for further details, including affected date codes. 

http://www.truthaboutpetfood.com/articles/458/1/Premium-Edge-Cat-Food-Voluntary-Withdrawal/Page1.html

If you have been feeding your cats this product and particular lots/dates and your cats are exhibiting decreased appetite followed by neurological symptoms, please contact your vet, Dr. Hubbard, and Diamond Pet Food.   http://www.premiumedgepetfood.com/

Discussion in Itchmo Forums.   http://itchmoforums.com/your-problems-with-pet-food/premium-edge-cat-food-voluntary-recall-t9328.0.html;msg138589;topicseen#msg138589

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Itchmo: News For Dogs & Cats

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VIRAL DOG NECK SCRATCH & SMILE

VIRAL DOG NECK SCRATCH and SMILE, awwww yeah! That’s a relaxed dog that smiles when its neck is scratched. Watch out for shedding! Chow Chow German Shepherd mix sheds enough hair for two dogs when its furry neck is scratched. Smiling dog makes everyone happy. Feel better because of the awesome Viral Dog, Stella the Wonderdog (the Classic Game Room mascot and warmer of feet).

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Wi-Fi Dog Teaches Class On Alternative Energy

True American Dog

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April Showers Brings May Flower $100 Paypal Cash #Giveaway Event Plus More! Ends 4/30

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April Showers Bring May Flowers Event
 Prizes:
GRAND PRIZE to 1 winner:
 $ 100 Paypal Cash!!
7 separate winners will receive one of the GC's below!
$ 10 GC to NanaRoberts Crafts
$ 10 Target GC
$ 10 Scentsy GC
$ 15 Target GC
$ 10 GC
$ 10 Walmart GC
$ 10 Walgreens GC
Brought to you by 
Enter on Rafflecopter below and Good Luck all!

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LoveMy2Dogs

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