EOTW: Back to School for Brody One Ear!

Today we bring to you our second Ear of the Week:

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Yes, the kids are back to school this week, but why should they have all the fun? Just because a dog only has one ear doesn’t mean he can’t be fully functional.

Really, in many ways this ear surpasses the original one. His old ear didn’t have a pen holder, after all.

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He’s already learned that the hat and the camera mean fun time and treats, so rest assured no one is more on board with this ear project that Brody himself.

Now if only I could teach him to make coffee…

Pawcurious: With Veterinarian and Author Dr. V

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Offside in Airole!

Airole, Italy

Offside!

~
  
Hors-jeu!
RIVIERA DOGS

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Why is the Canada lynx a distinct species?

canada lynx

For many years, there was a bit of debate about how many Lynx species there were. In the 1980s,  the Canadian lynx and the Eurasian lynx  were thought to represent a single species.

The Canada lynx is not a northern bobcat, as one might think. These cats are very similar to each other in size, and it actually gets quick touchy trying tease apart historical accounts of bobcats and lynx in North America.

But bobcats come from earlier invasion of the Lynx lineage that came into North America between 2-5 million years ago. The Canada lynx came about when an ancestral Eurasian lynx came into North America within the past 200,000 years. The Canada lynx is more closely related to the modern Eurasian lynx than to the bobcat.

Compared to the bobcat and Eurasian lynx, the Canada lynx is a bit weird. Eurasian lynx and bobcats are very much generalist predators. The Canada lynx is a super specialized predator. They pretty much live on snowshoe hares alone, and their populations track the snowshoe hare population cycles. It is pretty weird that this animal has hitched itself to such a tenuous prey species.

One could make the case that the Canada lynx is nothing more than a specialized Eurasian lynx, even though it is significant smaller.

I think this is a bit hard to justify. For one thing, there is absolutely no gene flow between Eurasian lynx and Canada lynx, except in captivity. Canada lynx, bobcats, and Eurasian lynx all can interbreed and produce fertile offspring, but unless the Bering Land Bridge appears again, there is no way for Eurasian lynx to arrive to hybridize with them.

I also don’t think there is any way to get around the super-specialized body of the Canada lynx, which is long-legged and big-pawed. It’s also a lot smaller than the Eurasian lynx.

So I think it is hard to get around the simple fact that this animal is distinct enough to be a species, even it can hybridize with bobcats and Eurasian lynx.


Natural History

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Dramatic rescue of a puppy lost at sea

The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

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The Mindy Project’s Ike Barinholtz Promotes Pet Adoption

As Nurse Morgan Tookers on the comedy series The Mindy Project he’s known for being doggedly devoted to his many canine companions, and in real life actor Ike Barinholtz has shown his affection…



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DogTipper

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Trick or Treat with Brody One Ear!

A special day calls for a special ear. And a poem, of course.

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Trick or treat!

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I lick feet.

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Give me something that has meat!

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If you don’t, just beware-

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I’ll eat up your underwear!

 

Have a great day and be safe all! I get to go see Danny Elfman perform the Nightmare Before Christmas tonight at the Hollywood Bowl so I’ve got Jack Skellington on the mind 😀

Pawcurious: With Veterinarian and Author Dr. V

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Nighty-Night, Sleep Tight

I love both the picture and the sentiment here. Until next time, Good day, and good dog!


Doggies.com Dog Blog

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Intersect-Where Your Story and Gods Story Converge DVD review

Created by the author of “Citizen, Your Role in the Alternate Kingdom”, “Intersect” is a DVD resource made by him and Chris Rogers and designed to help do one of the hardest thing in a Christian life, starting up spiritual conversations, particularly in a time and world where Political Correctness and “Don’t talk about your…



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Sunflower Faith

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Halloween kitty

Bobcat came by last night, very appropriate for the holiday.

Source.


Natural History

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California’s End of Life Option Act and How it Would have Changed Mom’s Death

In 2014, a young, vibrant woman named Brittany Maynard moved from the home in California she had known all her life so that she could die on her own terms in Oregon. Diagnosed with glioblastoma, arguably one of the most monstrous forms of cancer in this world, Maynard was willing to uproot her life, put her face out into the world, and share a most intimate decision with a universe of strangers in order to help people understand why someone might make the decision to hasten their death.

With little fanfare and no more than a small sidebar in the local newspaper, California has just become the fifth state to legalize assisted death for terminally ill patients. When I read it, on a plane on my way to deliver a talk on how we deal with death in our culture, I cried. I cried for Maynard, and for my mother (seen here on the left at last year’s Fourth of July bash), and for me.

June28th 4th @ Santa Luz 110

Like so many others, I was transfixed with Maynard’s bravery in opening herself up to scrutiny and criticism. I put myself in her place and wondered what I would have done in the same situation. As a veterinarian who routinely helps people gently end the lives of pets suffering from terminal disease, the idea is not as challenging to me as it is to many. Especially with brain cancer- something that can rob you of the essence of who you are, turn you into someone else, snaking its way without order or reason through your control panel until your body can no longer hang on.

It is, to me, one of the most petrifying propositions out there.

So when my own young and vibrant mother was diagnosed with the very same cancer not five months after Maynard’s death, I fell to my knees and cried with grief, with anger, and above all with terror. For we, too, live in California, and my mother’s delicate health by the time she was diagnosed did not allow us the luxury of moving anywhere. Three weeks before her diagnosis, she was hiking though Red Rock. Three weeks after, she was bedbound. It happened that quickly.

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My entire family was focused on my dear Aunt Michele’s mobility, and no one knew what was brewing with my Mom.

I found myself preoccupied with fear for my mother, and worry about what I might do if her pain and suffering were unable to be controlled. Hospice and palliative care is excellent, but even that has its limits. People I thought were my friends sent me all sorts of horror stories they have heard about this cancer, expressing remorse at the news and the hope that my mother, ever so dignified, would not be one who would lose it all in the fugue of neoplasia.

I am really good at delivering an easy death. I have access to drugs no one else can get, and they are remarkable. We can give them to dogs and cats and rats and horses, but not to people. People have to ride it out on cocktails with middling degrees of efficacy. Our own perceptions make it worse: more than half of palliative care professionals have been accused of “euthanasia or murder” by providing adequate palliation to dying people, because euthanasia for a pet is mercy but for a human is dastardly. We have a long way to go in how we think of these things.

Fearing the Loss of Control

Instead of concentrating on my time with my mother, I spent most of it worrying- what would I do if the meds stopped working? How would I respond if she asked me to help her die? How could I refuse? How could I say yes? I had no reassurance that the necessary tools to control the situation were in my toolbox, and that took away from so many little moments I wish I could have back.

In the end, my mother’s cancer took mercy on her. She died quickly, as she wished, and never once complained of pain. She forgot things, felt sleepy, and drifted off oh so gently into that good night. It was a blessing, strange as it sounds. She willed herself to progress the way she wanted.

Had we been given access to life ending drugs, she would likely have filled the prescription.

Had she filled the prescription, secure in the knowledge that she had some control, she would not have taken them. There is no doubt in my mind. She didn’t need them. It doesn’t change my mind one bit as to their necessity, doesn’t make me any less inclined to cheer this new law and fight any who would seek its appeal. It would not have changed the medicine, but it would have changed the emotion, the fear, and the terror.

Because it’s not the inevitability of the outcome that matters in these situations, it’s the little bits of control we are given in times where so much of it has been taken away.

And that would have changed so much.

 

Pawcurious: With Veterinarian and Author Dr. V

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