Good Job, Internet: Walmart Pulls Offensive Dead Dog Halloween Prop

Yesterday, before the Internet caught wind of it, you could buy a prop of a dead dog at Walmart. A dog who was apparently hit by a car — “bloody roadkill,” according to the description. The manufacturer did a pretty honest job, including lots of blood and a “large tire track squished through its mid torso.” Oh, and it included a chain “for dragging purposes.” 

All in all, a good, completely insane and horrifying addition to the Walmart line, which was pulled down as Internet outrage grew, as it should have been. Actually, it should have been taken down before it was even put up, before it was even made, before it was even an idea. Dead dogs shouldn’t be a part of Halloween fun, especially at Walmart. Someone should have known that.  

The prop was distributed by Morris Costumes and made by Distortions Unlimited. Though it has gone from Walmart’s site, it’s still searchable on Unbeatable Sale, though you cannot purchase it. And it appears to have been sold and pulled from Amazon, Sears, and many other retailers, too, though you’d be hard-pressed to find it there anymore. However, we found it on Nightmare Factory

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Here's a screencap of the page on Unbeatable Sale:

 

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Ugly stuff. As if the photo isn't bad enough, here's the text that appeared on the Walmart site, according to a post on the Randy Report. It's perhaps the most insane Walmart description ever:

You have seen bloody road kill, this is bloody road kill. Foam filled latex prop of a skinned dog with a large tire track squished through its mid torso. Chain attached for dragging purposes.

After people caught wind of it on the Walmart site, outrage grew. Facebook posts went up; people left comments on Walmart, Sears, and Amazon; Leslye Brown quickly put up a Change.org petition to get the item removed.

And you know what? It worked. Yesterday, Distortions Unlimited apologized for the product and discontinued it immediately. Here's a message the company released, according to Culture Map Dallas:

"We make products for primarily for haunted houses so we have to walk that thin line between horror yet OK and over the top. This is a tricky thing to do at times and it appears like we crossed the line with the dog. We were not trying to be insensitive of offend anyone although it appears like we did. We are sorry and the product has been discontinued immediately."

Good work, Internet.


The Scoop | The Scoop

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On Gardening: Control the pests that pester pets

On Gardening: Control the pests that pester pets
Homeowners can also use topical products like Frontline Plus Advantage. There are also IGR products for topical use, such as Precor and vIGRen, sold in pet stores. Control requires 4-6 weeks. Always follow the product label. Another option are flea
Read more on Anniston Star

Natural flea preventives can be toxic
While the Environmental Protection Agency regulates synthetic topical flea control products, it has no control over plant-derived natural flea products that contain essential oils. So consumers need to research these products themselves. The Animal
Read more on Reading Eagle

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so cute ! I was trying to find pictures of Dobby (…

so cute ! I was trying to find pictures of Dobby (from the Harry Potter movie)to show a friend why I sometimes call my dog "Dobby" (he has the same eyes and earings when he looks at you while you are eating…) and I found your blog and video. So lovely !
I am a dogsitter in Paris and I sustain all pet defense organisations !
Please continue your fight

Katleen
BAD RAP Blog

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Lakeshore Learning $200 e-Gift Card #Giveaway ~ Ends 9/16



Have you ever purchased anything from Lakeshore Learning Material‘s? I have and I have to say that they are some really great items for kids and even better things for me, as a Daycare Provider. I love ordering all kinds of supplies from Lakeshore Learning.

Anyway, they are a really great giveaway going on over on their Facebook page right now.
So head on over HERE and enter to win a $ 200 e-gift card!!
Disclaimer: I received nothing more than extra entries into this giveaway for this post by others entering. Images and information are from Lakeshore Learning.

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LoveMy2Dogs

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Mite M – De Liefde

abbonneer en subscribe.
Video Rating: 5 / 5

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#FREE Emerald Breakfast On The Go, Coupon, Today ONLY!!







FREE Emerald Breakfast on the go™ with Digital Coupon!
Free Breakfast on the go!, 5 ct

ONLY AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD ON 9/13/2013

Get it HERE!!
 
 
 

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LoveMy2Dogs

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The strange twisted story of canine circovirus

You have probably been hearing a lot about canine circovirus. So have I. You may have heard some conflicting things about this virus. So have I. Because I love you all and I want you to know what I know, I’ve spent the day trying to make sense of the information that’s out there. Here’s what I know so far and why I’m not recommending mass panic at this time.

Part 1: It’s the food

Here’s how the story evolved, as far as I can piece together.

1. In mid-August, P&G pet foods issues a voluntary recall of certain lots of dry food manufactured at an East Coast plant over a 10 day period because of the possibility of Salmonella.

2. Last week, The Pet Spot, a pet kennel in Ohio, learns that several dogs who had been at the facility in the last few weeks had become sickened with a severe hemorrhagic gastroenteritis/ vasculitis type disease. Three of those dogs died.

3. The kennel owner, trying to figure out what was going on, noted that his kennel’s stock food is Iams. He makes a “hey, we may want to look into this” sort of statement which gets digested, churned up in the bowels of social media and local media, and becomes

OMG EUKANUBA IS KILLING DOGS AGAIN (CHAOS/PITCHFORKS)

mob

The only problem is, it wasn’t. By this time, P&G- which coincidentally is headquartered in Ohio- hears this story and of course they would like to know what happened to those dogs. I spoke with Jason Taylor over at P&G, who among many duties has the awesomely fun job of managing pet food recalls when and if they occur, to ask what happened next.

According to Taylor, despite the fact that the kennel owner did not have the lot codes of the food he was using, P&G was able to ascertain the lot numbers based on order history and shipping details, determining that the food being fed at the kennel was not part of the recall, and in fact was not even manufactured at the same factory.

But since they were there anyway with a group of microbiologists and toxicity experts and a small business owner who was under a lot of pressure to figure out what was going on, they figured they would add their resources to the investigation, crawling around with cotton swabs and all that science-y stuff and send it off to see if there was any identifiable pathogen in the environment. There was none. The facility was cleared to re-open.

Still with me?

Part 2: It’s circovirus

4. By now, the state veterinarian, the local veterinary community, and the Ohio State veterinary hospital are involved. People put their heads together. Someone says, “hey, I remember reading about a dog in California that died this April with similar symptoms; he had circovirus, which is weird and unusual because it’s normally a pig disease. We should test for that too.” The news, already paying attention after losing the whole pet food angle, is still interested. Under the tender editorial guidance of a click-happy news site, “we are investigating this possibility” becomes:

OMG A SCARY NEW VIRUS WILL KILL YOUR DOG

because if there’s one thing the spell check challenged online journalism teams at local newspapers like to do, it’s to drive traffic with leads like “It’s a scary new disease, that can kill your dog” then follow up with some man-on-the street interviews with statements such as “It can like, kill your dog, and that’s like bad for them.”

hazmat4

Uh oh.

As anyone who has read any sort of newspaper or watched any news channel in the last decade will attest to, journalism has become less about accurate reporting and more about fast reporting. It’s the nature of the beast these days, but it’s why everything needs to be taken with a grain or bushel of salt because guess what?

According to a UC Davis professor who tested samples from three of the affected dogs, only one tested positive for circovirus. You may not have heard that yet because Ohio can’t test for circovirus; samples got sent to California and despite what CSI tells us, results are not instantaneous. It took this long for the official results to come in, which is about 4 days too slow for a news cycle that is moving on to the next disaster at midnight.

Part 3: It’s…a case in progress

So what do we know about circovirus and dogs, exactly? Not much. What caused these illnesses? Not sure.

  • Correlation does not imply causation. In the above referenced piece, Dr. Pesavento points to an academic article published in April that  talks about the dog in California, then went looking for the presence of circovirus in other dogs. To sum up, it was found in some dogs with diarrhea. It was also found in some healthy dogs. Most of the sick dogs were co-infected with some other pathogen as well. Clear as mud.

So again, what do we know about circovirus in dogs? That it exists. It may or may not cause disease. That is all the scientists are willing to say at the moment. Wordier summary is in the Ohio Department of Agriculture press release.

That is soooo anticlimactic and unsexy and un-newsworthy, and as a person who likes exciting news as much as the next person I wish I had something more earth-shattering to report. But at the end of the day I am also a person that likes TL:DR summaries, so to put it all in one handy image:

circotagion

Part 4: So now we torch the dog park, right?

I in no way want to minimize what happened to those affected dogs, who suffered from a rapid onset, devastating illness. It is entirely possible that circovirus will be identified as the cause, and in that case we can revisit this issue and talk more. I as much as anyone else hope the patient scientists who make this their life’s work will be rewarded for their diligence with a definitive cause. As of now, there is none. We live such stressful lives as it is, I like to wait until I’m forced to panic so I don’t spend my entire life wedged in the corner covered in Saran Wrap. While we wait to determine if this is necessary, here’s what you can do:

1. Remember the number of reported cases stands at ‘miniscule’. If you’re worrying about circovirus while your dog is running around a year late on his parvo booster, I would recommend re-focusing your attention, at least for the time being. That being said:

2. Call the vet immediately if your dog shows any signs of this disease. If your dog has bloody diarrhea, you should be at the vet ASAP anyway; this advice has not changed since before this virus emerged. The affected pets became rapidly, severely ill: rapid treatment was essential to positive outcome.

3. Avoid high risk environments. Consider the fact that all of the reported cases happened in dogs that had recently been to kennels or doggie daycares. High concentration of dogs in one place means higher likelihood of disease spread.  I actually don’t recommend carte blanche avoiding these environments, but if you are really concerned or if your dog has a less than hardy immune system, dogs survive just fine without those facilities.

Pawcurious: With Pet Lifestyle Expert and Veterinarian Dr. V.

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THE ROCK: Chapter 13: Ridiculous Part 3

“Cast before a silver sheet,
Tracing lines that never meet.”

Those are the first two lines to a poem I wrote a long, long while ago, even way, way before Malcolm was diagnosed, and they made little sense to me at the time. 

They do now.

——–
YBD’s Notes 1:  Though I have plenty more ridiculous things to say and do, I’m done with this chapter and it’s time to move on and bring the first book, The Rock, to its conclusion.  

YBD’s Notes 2:  Sailing is an inexact metaphor for life.  Ashore, the time to jibe or tack doesn’t always translate but I’ve come about now.

YBD’s Notes 3:  Next chapter I’ll talk about the good, the bad, and the ugly of sponsorship and that’ll set the stage for the final chapter.  

2 Dogs 2,000 Miles

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Cool Infection images

Some cool infection images:

Stem infection
infection

Image by IITA Image Library
Fusarium infected cassava stem causing the death of the plant.

Infection
infection

Image by Cat Rocketship
Oil on wood, 9×12.

Stem infection
infection

Image by IITA Image Library
Fusarium infected cassava stem causing the death of the plant.

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Two Towers Four Paws

A beautiful blog by Teri Modisette

last remaining dogs
Eleven years ago today, the Twin Towers slipped from the sky and plummeted to earth as America watched in shock. As that once beautiful Autumn day wore on to evening, news outlets reported many people still trapped, slowing dying in the avalanche of metal. How did they know? Those people used cell phones to call their families from beneath the remains of the World Trade Center. One by one, they said final goodbyes as the last of their cell phone batteries blinked out.

No one yet knew the death toll would reach nearly 3,000. All the rescue teams could do was send help. That night as pictures and “Please help me find my son” and “Please help me find my daughter” flyers went up around NYC, help arrived at Ground Zero on four legs.
Several sets of four legs, to be exact.
Emergency workers had flooded the area with light, enabling them to pair with public volunteers in a desperate search for the living, but they needed help from something with better hearing and a better sense of smell than the average human being. They were helped by Moxie and Tara from Massachusetts, Guinness from California, Kaiser from Indianapolis, Bretagne from Texas, Red from Maryland, Hoke from Denver. It was a long shot to call in search and rescue dogs. As good as the dogs were, 9/11 was undeniably a large-scale tragedy.
Search-and-rescue dogs are trained to pick up certain scents on the ground and in the air. Well-trained search dogs have proven to be the fastest way to locate a victim in the aftermath of a disaster like an earthquake or hurricane. Disaster search-and-rescue dogs are trained to find people in incredibly unstable environments, where smoke or chemical smells might affect the results of the dog’s search.
Three hundred and eighteen search-and-rescue dogs were trained to find the living who may have survived 9/11. Unfortunately, the terrorist attacks were a true disaster, making it a fruitless search. Despite this, the dogs at Ground Zero were seen doing what dogs do so well– comforting the firemen and first responders during the darkest hours of their lives.
In total, 950 canine dog teams served in response to September 11, 2001. They served at Ground Zero, the Pentagon, and that field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania.
Eleven years later, 2 Million Dogs remembers the day our best friends experienced  alongside all in this great nation– and the sweet snuggles and tail wags as our tears rolled down.
We will never forget.
Teri’s blog and all of the blogs posted by her and Erich Trapp can be read at the 2 Million Dogs Blog
——–
YBD’s Notes 1: Thank you, Teri for this beautifully written tribute to the service dogs of 9/11.  
YBD’s Notes 2:  Lest we all forget, dogs are essential to our survival and the very essence of our goodness.  

2 Dogs 2,000 Miles

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