Why Dogs Puke

Dogs puke just like humans do if they’re overcome with nausea and acute indigestion.

If your dog swallows a solid object, it often vomits it back up. If the object is small enough it may pass through the dog’s intestinal system and be released in its feces. If the object is too large or it has sharp edges, you should plan on an emergency visit to the vet for x-rays.

If your dog has eaten leaves or berries from a bush you’re unfamiliar with, it’s important you know whether the plant is poisonous or not. The easiest way to check for poisonous plants is to call the ASPCA at (888) 426-4435.

If a dog eats table scraps that are high in fat content it can easily end up having intestinal distress. A dog’s digestive system was not designed to digest rich, fatty foods like humans eat. These types of food are often not healthy for us, let alone for our dogs. If your dog begins vomiting soon after scarfing down something from your table, it’s a clear indication that you need to avoid giving it any type of food you normally eat.

A dog may also puke because it’s allergic to certain foods. If you recently started your dog on a new diet and the vomiting began shortly thereafter, you might try mixing half of its old food with half of the new food and watch closely for changes in behavior or lingering illness. It’s possible that an intolerance or aversion to ingredients in the new food may be causing the vomiting. If you suspect this may be the cause, you can continue changing the ratio of old food to the new food to see if the vomiting goes away.

If your dog sometimes pukes due to any of the following, it will require a visit to the vet for diagnosis and treatment:
(1) Infection with parasites, viruses or bacteria can cause gastrointestinal infections also known as viral gastroenteritis. Diarrhea and vomiting are the most obvious symptoms. Many different types of bacteria and parasites can also cause GI infections and diarrhea but most of these are not serious and will go away on their own after a few days; however, others can be serious.

(2) Ulcers can be caused by anti-inflammatory medications prescribed for skin conditions, arthritis, or other chronic health problems. Pain relief medications such as aspirin and ibuprofen inhibit a hormone-like substance that acts as a protection for a dog’s stomach lining. Prolonged use of these medications can cause severe stomach ulcers in dogs. Another less common cause of canine stomach ulcers is a mast cell cancer in the dog’s skin. Mast cell cancers release histamine which leads to stomach ulcers.

(3) Kidney Failure early signs are increased water consumption and increased urine output. Signs of more advanced kidney failure include loss of appetite, depression, vomiting and diarrhea.

(4) Cancers signs that warrant a visit to your veterinarian include any new lump or bump; a change in size, shape, or consistency of an existing lump; a runny nose, especially if bloody; difficulty urinating or bloody urine; limping or a change in gait; foul breath and lethargy.

(5) Inflammatory bowel disease causes are unknown. Genetics, nutrition, infectious agents, and abnormalities of the immune system may all play a role. The most common signs of inflammatory bowel disease in dogs are vomiting, diarrhea, and weight loss. Vomiting is more common when the stomach or upper portion of the small intestine are affected and diarrhea is more common when the colon is involved. There is an increase in the frequency of defecation, but less stool is produced each time. There is often increased mucous or some blood in the stool. Sometimes stools become loose. Many times the diarrhea and vomiting may be irregular.

(6) Liver disease early signs include chronic intermittent vomiting and diarrhea. Vomiting is more common than diarrhea, loss of appetite, or weight loss. Drinking and urinating more often than normal may be the first signs, and a key reason for visiting the vet.

If your dog pukes repeatedly and the cause is not readily apparent, you should schedule an exam with your vet. Your pet’s health and life may depend upon it.

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‘Traveling Light’ Contest for a Free Copy

The publisher of ‘Traveling Light’ is offering a contest for a free copy of Andrea Thalasinos’s new book!  The book was published recently and Andrea Thalasinos is currently on her book tour.  If you want to enter the contest for a free copy, just leave a comment to this post!  The contest will be open until Thursday, August 8.  The winner will be chosen Friday.

You can find more information about the book here!


PetsitUSA Blog

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Skin allergies [Bimbo Talks] Ep 2

Subscribe! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=alozerk Facebook! http://www.facebook.com/Nightowlcinematics Part 1 here : http://www.youtube….

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In Plain View (Valley Of Choice – Book Two) by Olvia Newport ~ Book Review

Title: In Plain View (Valley of Choice Series – Book Two)

Publish Date: June 1, 2013


 You can follow Olivia Newport on: 

 And you can follow Barbour Publishing on:

Description

After leaving her outwardly successful but unsatisfying life for Amish simplicity, Annie Friesen continues to dismantle her technology-dependent world. Despite her best intentions and her love for Rufus Beiler, one challenge after another falls across her path. In counterpart, Ruth, an Amish woman, wrestles with her reasons for leaving the community despite the pain it causes the people who love her. When the Amish and the English work together on a community project, an explosion hurls doubt in every direction. Determined to find proof of what happened, Annie learns lessons in trust, humility, and letting go.

My thoughts

I have some mixed thoughts about this book. I loved every part of the book that was about Rufus and Annie but the parts that were about the ancestors from way back was a bit confusing to keep track of some times. It was interesting because I feel that it is all going to come together in the end but with some of the names being handed down it did get a bit confusing and hard to keep track of especially when it jumped forward in years.
Annie was trying so hard to become the Amish person that she wanted to become and her parents seem to be trying so hard to fight that all the while just the opposite seemed to be happening to Ruth. She still wanted the plain life but wanted to get her college education while Annie just wanted to leave her English life behind and start living a plain life with Rufus. And she wanted that plain life whether she lived it with Rufus or not and she needed for her parents to learn to believe that.
All of Rufus’s family has welcomed Annie into their family with open arms, now if she could just get Rufus to see how much she really loved him or would he really be better with a pure Amish woman? Is Annie better to stay and get and start the baptism classes or return to the English life that she once new? So much is going through Annie’s mind and she is always wondering if Rufus is in love with her or not.
Even though I don’t give this book 4 or 5 stars, I am definitely looking forward to reading the next book in this series called, Taken For English.
 
You can read my review of Accidentally Amish (Valley of Choice – Book One) HERE.

Images and Exerpt are from NetGalley and the video is from YouTube, compliments of Barbour Publishing.com.
I was not paid for this review, I did however receive a copy of the book for my Kindle from NetGalley. The opinions of this book are mine and mine alone.

 siggy


LoveMy2Dogs

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Mood

I had to go to the car to grab something… she thought we were leaving.  This is her “What? But we just got here look.”

Life has settled down dramatically these past few weeks… at least for now.  But I’m still not really in a mood to take photos or rather to edit or do anything with them.  I’ve still been taking my camera most days and taking at least some photos but they are mainly just sitting on my computer doing nothing.

I got a Waboba and I like it.

I have a client order that needs to be fulfilled and I keep putting it off – claiming (to myself) that I haven’t had the time.  And that isn’t true.  I have had the time, but I just haven’t been in the right mood, at the right time. Hopefully I’ll snap out of it this weekend as I’ll need to do the order as well as edit some more agility pictures from Regionals.

They are supposed be used on land but it bounced pretty good so we just went with it.

So while I was going to do a casual review of the Waboba fetch ball, I’m going to leave that for another day.

And I wondered why she stunk to high heaven after this walk.

Coulee enjoyed it.  What more do you need to know?

Riding home with her new toy.

Crazy Coulee and Little Lacey

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Bayer HealthCare | Advantage® II Topical vs. Pill Video

www.bayerus.com – Watch this video to learn about the difference between topical solutions and oral flea products. Bayer Corporation, headquartered in Pittsb…

How to apply topical flea medication to pet.
Video Rating: 0 / 5

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Chapter 11 Continued. Finding Faith

Faith is a funny thing. That I lacked it wasn’t Emily’s fault, it was mine. 
 
Having sat through so many sermons and listened to countless testimonies in church, I had already made the deduction that faith was the easy way out.   
 
Fuck up, ask for forgiveness, it’s all good.
 
That may work for the laity but people of science don’t get off that easily nor would they care to.  From Newton to Kierkegaard to Einstein to Tesla, they gave up lifetimes to understand the mysteries of the world. 
 
When I left high school and set my love for Emily aside, I decided that the answers I sought would be found in science.  I was certain of that.
 
——–
 
And when I first had the vision of the walk, I struggled with it.  In fact, I walked away from it because it was too risky to the boys.  I didn’t want it, didn’t need it and yet it didn’t leave me. 
 
The turning point was a sermon I listened to about the difference between a dream and a mission. Discerning between the two turned out rather easily – you can only walk away from one. 
 
I would soon learn that having faith is infinitely harder than learning and erudition.   And I couldn’t take the first step without it. 
 
——–
 
YBD’s Notes 1: I killed my laptop so I’m writing on a Sony Vaio which isn’t so easy with my large hands.
 
YBD’s Notes 2: I can’t believe I spelled Kierkegaard correctly the first go about it. 
 
YBD’s Notes 3: Only 2 Chapters left in the first book.
 
 
 
 
 
  
 
 

2 Dogs 2,000 Miles

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Solving A Problem With The ABCs

Cutie jumping up.

Let’s look at the ABCs series thus far, especially this post, and see how we can apply the ABCs to solving a real problem.

I started a new basic class this Saturday and a few of the dogs jump up when they meet people, as one might expect for adolescent dogs. In the following class hour, a Canine Good Citizen class, another adolescent had the same issue with the polite greeting test.

I like this problem as an example for the ABCs because the components in the formula are clear and easy to identify.

Antecedent -> Behavior -> Consequence

Person Approaches -> Dog jumps up onto person -> Attention is given to dog

The antecedent is "person approaches". It’s not "dog sees person." This is because the dog cannot be part of the antecedent. In more complex situations the tendency might be to describe an antecedent with the dog included such as "the dog sees another dog" but that won’t work since one of our most powerful measures in solving a problem is controlling the antecedents, either as part of a behavior modification plan or even permanently. It we put the dog in the antecedent we’ve lumped the problem together and solving it becomeS more complicated.

In this case we are going to control the antecedent in two ways: we are going to avoid greetings as much as possible until we can better control them, and while we are training we will carefully control how quickly people approach and how close they will come.

The behavior is the easiest component to identify. The dogs I worked with Saturday were all exuberant "teenagers" that love people and really want to let them know that when they meet them.

After our rather long talk about counter-conditioning and desensitization (go to the category page scroll down a bit) it is worth noting that when we see the relaxed/goofy body postures, wagging tails, and what most observers would call "happy dogs" we know that these dogs are not reacting to the approaching people with fear or aggression and that CC&DS is not what is called for. We don’t want to change how they feel about people, we want to change how they react to them.

The consequence is what often confuses people. For these dogs just getting to the people is reinforcing enough to maintain the behavior. Hugging someone who is holding up their hands and saying "Stop! Get off! Down! Enough!" isn’t reinforcing for us, but that’s not the point. It is for the dog and it is maintaining the behavior.

So how do we apply the formula to this problem?

I already mentioned controlling the antecedent. Obviously this is not a viable long-term strategy. Short term we need to curb greetings because the reinforcement is strengthening the behavior, but this is a temporary step.

In this case changing the consequence is tricky. The only way we could keep the "A" and the "B" and alter the outcome would be to make greeting people unpleasant, and this could have obvious side effects. If we teach the dog that greeting some people results in something bad, he will become wary and maybe even defensive around strangers.

But there is a way to manipulate the situation: if the dog (like most) makes it obvious that he will jump up before the person arrives, we can have them stop or move away when he does this. This is the common "red light/green light" or "yo-yo" drill that many trainers use in classes. Done effectively, it actually becomes a way to use DRI to fix this problem.

  1. Our dog is on leash, held by his owner. Sitting at his side.
  2. Person approaches, dog gets out of sit. Person turns (dramatically if possible) and walks away.
  3. Repeat several times.
  4. Eventually, person approaches, dogs holds sit! Person continues to approach. When very close dog gets up. Person moves away.
  5. Eventually, person approaches, dog holds sit all the way until person reaches team and can greet human.

This is obviously an ideal scenario, mainly because I didn’t want to write another 500 words just describing the scenario. (I need to film this with a green dog and then edit the heck out of it.)

By starting with a sit and using getting up it as the criteria for having the person move away we focused on what we wanted instead of what we didn’t want.

Sometimes having the handler reward the dog with food is appropriate. Sometimes it adds to the dog’s excitement and makes things worse. Sometimes it even takes the dog’s focus completely off the exercise. It depends. In this rosy scenario attention was the main reinforcer and I went with it.

How long did it take? With the dog in the CGC class I was able to actually do this procedure in a few minutes. But this was a dog that had already passed a basic class and had a strong history of reinforcement for sitting. Pick a behavior that your dog is already proficient at when using this kind of problem solving.

What problems have you had success with solving? What problems have you stumped? What do you think of this approach to problem solving? Let me know in the comments!

Also, have you joined my email list yet? Every week I send an update on new posts to the blog, with a few extra notes from me. I’d love to have you onboard!

Solving A Problem With The ABCs is a post written by . You can see the actual post at Dog Training in Bergen County New Jersey


Dog Spelled Forward Website and Blog

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Dog Puppy Training


Dog Puppy Training

 

puppyA new puppy in the home excites everyone especially children but make sure you got the puppy for a good reason and not just on a spur of the moment feeling. Like they say dogs are for life not just for Christmas. A puppy can bring lots of happy memories and times but they have a lot of training and work involved to, they are not all fun and no work!

 

A puppy’s temperament depends on where the puppy has been brought up and what type of breed he is. German shepherds, Rottweilers, bull dogs and boxers are all guard type dogs so tend to be very loving and protective. Border and bearded collies tend to be herding dogs and reared on farms and tend to be quite enthusiastic and never sit still (be aware because they are reared on a farm they may be a little bit nervous around modern day technologies, such as bridges, loud noises etc). Labradors, gun dogs and pointer are all hunting dogs so expect them to be full of energy and laughable moments. Of course these are just general expectations every dog has its day…and its personality!

 


Puppy dog training is something that can be achieved in a matter of weeks depending how much time and attention you spend on it. You don’t need to train for hours and hours a day, a few minutes several times a day is all it takes. The first thing you need to train your new puppy in is obedience, commands like sit, come, heel, stay and fetch are basic enough for them to learn. As they get older you can incorporate commands like paw, roll over and play dead! Training a young puppy is not as hard as you may think as they are like a blank sheet of paper waiting to be written on. The way and things that that they are taught will stick to them and will influence them later on in life, although training isn’t forever so you need spend a few minutes every day just to keep reminding them what to do.

 

There are not so nice consequences involved when puppies aren’t trained, for a start your house will constantly be a toiler ground for them and your furniture will have massive holes in it. Puppies are like babies and need to be taught the difference between right and wrong, to do this you need some puppy dog training!

 

Many handlers experienced or in-experienced are turning towards training products and aids but training can be done without these methods. Just a bit of good old hard work! A puppy may take several months to training but when it is complete the rewards will be well worth it, but don’t forget to top up on your training for several minutes each day or your dog will slowly forget and you’ll have to start all over again, with an even bigger task, training an older dog!


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Flea Market & RV Park at Menge

Some cool Fleas images:

Flea Market & RV Park at Menge
Fleas

Image by MissMalaprop
Flea Market & RV Park at Menge, Pass Christian, Mississippi

Flea Market & RV Park at Menge
Fleas

Image by MissMalaprop
Flea Market & RV Park at Menge, Pass Christian, Mississippi

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