8 years old today and a clean bill of health

Miley turned 8 today, and she also received some good news at the vet today: Her TTA is officially a success and she can begin to do what she did before the surgery.

009

 


Natural History

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PetsitUSA’s 2015 Featured Pet Sitter: I’ve Got the ‘Scoop’!, LLC

Here’s an interview of Lori, owner of PetsitUSA’s 2015 featured pet sitter, I’ve Got the ‘Scoop’!, LLC.

Thank you, Ryan!  It’s very exciting being interviewed by PetsitUSA and having the opportunity to help new pet sitters by sharing my experiences and insight.

Can you give us a little background about yourself?!!lori daisy expert pet sitter Pet Valu petsitusa

When I first started pet sitting, veteran sitters gave me the typical advice about learning to say “no,” setting boundaries, turning my phone off and never putting my business before my fam
ily.  I ignored it all, and I’m not going to offer that advice, because the benefits of owning a business allows each of us, as individuals, to make decisions based upon our personal goals, abilities, threshold, ethics and devotion to our pet parents and furry babies.

Our circumstances vary, from familial responsibilities, some transition from another profession still working another job, while others have no time constraints or limitations.  The most important consideration is determining the needs of your clients and their beloved pets, because that’s why we become professional pet sitters:  To provide care needed for animals in the absence of a parent and/or when a parent requires our assistance with their pet.

Because my dedication is extreme and I lacked the ability to say “no,” implementing policies was necessary.  That is one suggestion I strongly recommend; have policies in place you are comfortable with, review them with clients, and have each client acknowledge acceptance of the terms by way of their signature so there are no miscommunications.  I adhere to my policies; however, there are situations warranting my waiving them without hesitation.

Change and restructuring typically means acquired knowledge and growth, not errors or poor decisions!

2015 was my fifth year providing love, enrichment and comprehensive pet care for furry babies with my pet sitting business, I’ve Got the ‘Scoop’!, LLC.  It has been a very rewarding year professionally with awards, recognition, community outreach events and expanding my non-profit volunteer efforts.  Unfortunately, working independently leaves minimal time to celebrate these accomplishments.

Being a recipient of NAPPS’ 2015 National Pet Sitting Business of the Year Award, and Winner of “The Best” Pet Sitter & Dog Walker of Burlington County, in The Best of Burlington County Times 2015, were both amazing honors I cannot believe I received!  I work endlessly and my devotion is second to none; still, to be nominated and voted for by clients, colleagues and the community are most cherished honors!  Another wonderful compliment was becoming a Board Member of the Boo Tiki Fund, a non-profit charity whose mission is to leave no pet without veterinary care.  Families experiencing grave financial hardships may receive a grant for their pets’ urgent medical needs.

I am extremely proud to have organized and hosted South Jersey’s Annual Pet Wellness Symposium for the
past two years and am looking forward to the third annual event on April 16, 2016.  It’s a fundraiser and powerful learning experience for all attendees.  Elite veterinarians volunteer their time and present educational lectures to pet professionals, parents, animal welfare heroes and members o2015 South Jersey's 2nd Annual Pet Wellness Flyerf the community alike, and some of the lectures incorporate live animals for a hands-on learning experience.  Pet businesses have an opportunity to showcase their services, also.  Last year’s symposium included a children’s component with a Bite Prevention class presented by fellow pet sitters, Endless Pawsabilities, reading with the Furry Angels Therapy Dogs, and a community service workshop to benefit FOBCAS and homeless animals at the Burlington County Animal Shelter.

A particularly fun event I planned the past three years has been the Spooktacular Pets of our town’s annual Halloween Parade, facilitating community members of all ages to participate in the festivities, even if their children have fur!  Animal lovers have the opportunity to walk with the doggies, and it’s a safe alternative for children and pets to enjoy a fun-filled family event!

Most recently, I started KiSS!, a Kitty Sponsorship Series, helping senior and fragile homeless kitties KiSS! their cages at a shelter and life in rescue goodbye, by sponsoring their adoption fees.  Another rewarding endeavor was raising money to donate 14 Fido Bags to local fire departments and first responders through the Fetch Foundation.

Although I organize and host many events, they’ve only been possible thanks to relationships I’ve established through volunteering and networking, having cultivated amazing collaborative efforts to benefit animals in need and those who love them.  I could never have accomplished these myself, and I thank the Borough of Palmyra, NJ, for their assistance in making these events possible.

But life and business are not always happy, happy and success, and a professional pet sitter must always have a solid backup plan in place for unforeseen emergencies.

2015 has been most challenging personally, having a scare with breast cancer, working with great physical pain, enduring procedures on my neck and back, and facing far too much loss.  The devastation of losing furry babies for whom I provide care is what I find to be the most difficult aspect of pet sitting.

My precious kitty, Simon, the love of my life, began having seizures and was diagnosed with hypertension and renal disease.  That weekend my father died suddenly.  Recently, both my mother- and father-in-law were diagnosed with cancer, and just a couple months ago, my very special, one!!!halloween petsitusa-of-a-kind, Simon, became an angel.  He was incredibly loving and a tremendous support to me and my son.

I don’t typically shout out about myself, but it’s important to know this can be you and so much more!  Always remember, because of you, pet parents are able to create wonderful memories, be available for work and familial responsibilities, and have peace of mind to walk out the door leaving their furry babies behind.  Always feel honored you were chosen by each parent and be thankful you have the opportunity to care for their beloved pets.

Please share what prompted you to start your pet sitting business:

My wonderful son, Billy, was diagnosed with diabetes at the age of 18.  He has significant special needs, and because of his cognitive challenges and inability to care for himself, let alone the continuous monitoring of blood glucose levels, multiple injections, exact measurements of food portions, his intake of all solids and liquids, carb counting, testing urine, etc., he required private-duty nursing when I was not with him.

A month after discharge from the hospital, Billy was diagnosed with renal and cardiac disease and required additional medications and intervention.  Because of his challenges with communication and extreme developmental delays, his care was very individualized with protocols specific for “Billy.”  He was not to be treated as “text-book” diagnoses.  In an attempt to keep stress at a minimum, necessary care was slowly integrated into his daily routine, which already was demanding.

After a few nurses were hired, they were quickly fired when care was to be provided “their” way, not what was best for Billy.  Despite having detailed orders written by physicians and my wishes to make life a little happier and more manageable for Billy, each nurse wanted to modify his regiment.  Sadly, they were unwilling to deviate from the “standard” and learn how to maintain his stable status.

This resulted in leaving my profession as a court reporter and accounts manager of the firm, after 15 years, so I would be available to provide care for my son.  At 47 years old, I wasn’t sure in what direction I would go.  I then realized there were parents in need of care for their dependent, beloved pets as I needed for my son; hence, founding my company, I’ve Got the ‘Scoop’!, LLC – Providing Love, Enrichment and Comprehensive Pet Care… as though YOU were there!

Why do pet owners choose your business over others in your area; is there something special that attracts your clients?

I ask this question of my pet parents, and their responses share many similarities.  Our relationship begins when parents view the love displayed in my photos and they tell me it’s obvious how much I care from the first time we speak about their pets.  My initial consultation is quite extensive and families’ comfort levels increase more so during that time.  I obtain a very thorough history and spend a substantial amount of time inquiring about specific details, observing, playing and interacting with their beloved pets, learning as much as possible.  This leads to establishing a bond that only grows stronger with subsequent visits.  Often times, a cat considered to be very skittish or a dog with anxiety that normally does not engage with strangers right away, if at all, warm up to me quickly, leaving pet parents astonished.  Their worries and anxieties are alleviated.

Parents remark how I genuinely adore their beloved pets and love the special bonds we share.  Pictures and videos I send depict their happiness and contentment, and parents feel their furry love
s are safe.  I am certified in animal first aid/CPR, participate in continuing education classes and keep up to date with current recalls and product information.

Since I do not use independent contractors or hire employees, it’s me, personally, coming to each visit, and parents are confident their pets are extremely well-cared for.  They are assured of my secure backup plan in the event of an unforeseen emergency, and most of my lovies have already met the only person I trust with them, my fiancé, Dan.  He is incredibly patient, compassionate, loving, observant and meticulous with details, and joins me during visits, in advance, so he’s not a stranger and is familiar with their routine if he is needed.

Parents have peace of mind knowing I’ll be available to communicate with detailed updates.  I ask for clarification, if needed, and technology has not taken over the personal service I provide to my families.  They also appreciate how I limit the number of pets on my schedule each day to allow for lengthy visits.  I spend quality time with my furry babies, becoming well aware of their individual needs, what makes them happy, feel loved and secure, and how the time their family is away may be most enriching and fun.

Whether a family is on vacation or gone for the day at work, the care their pet receives is
the same; it’s very comprehensive, not just walking and feeding or scooping a litter box and leaving.  We have spa days with preventative care, brushing hair and teeth, even cleaning ears and clipping nails if needed, extended walks or playtime, and lots of lap time full of hugs and kisses.

Families’ security and privacy are taken very seriously, as well as the safety and well-being of animals in my care.  I am very attentive to accommodating special requests and following detailed instructions others may feel are extreme or unnecessary.  Parents feel very confident with my thoroughness and abilities, and have peace of mind when their pets are in my care.

My precious kitty, Simon, had special needs, as well as my son, and it is because of he and Billy I understand the significance of small details, observant of nonverbal communication, aware of changes in routine and behavior of my furry babies, and highly respect the wishes of every pet parent as I wish a nurse to do for my son!  This all contributes to providing a higher quality of care which should be the standard practice of every pet sitter.

!!Lori Best of PetsitUSA 2What are some of the most useful advertising tools that you have used? 

I’m not fond of the word “advertise.”  Maybe because I cannot afford an advertising budget.  [Laughing]  Most say a business must have one; I disagree.  My passion for animals, knowledge and willingness to help all pet parents, not just clients, and networking with other pet professionals, earned me the reputation as a professional pet sitter and resource in my community.  People refer me by sharing their experiences and the exceptional care I provide for their pets, as well as the photos I send to parents display all of the love and fun we share.  Volunteering your time and becoming known as the expert pet sitter in your community is most rewarding.

How has social media impacted your business over the last few years? 

It consumes too much time!  However, social media allows me to reach a larger audience much faster.  I’m not good at sending quick messages, as I like my communication to be personable.  This tends to delay getting information out because of having to sit and write detailed emails.  With social media, providing pertinent information can be done expeditiously by sharing a post or an article; whether it’s alerting everyone to recall information, outbreak of infectious disease, wellness information, a lost pet in the community, health-related studies, seasonal tips to help protect our pets, a fundraising or adoption event.  It’s a quick way to share information from which others may benefit.

Do you have any general advice for new pet sitters?

If you wish to become a Professional Pet Sitter, you must earn the title and always respect it!!!

  • Distinguish yourself as professional.
  • Credentials are vital!  You should maintain current credentials and documentation to provide at every consultation: A passed background check, Certificate of Insurance for commercial liability coverage and any licenses and registrations.
  • I personally would not enter anyone’s home or provide any services until adequate insurance is obtained. I am not an expert in insurance, but highly recommend you evaluate the coverage of your policy and be certain you have, at minimum,  protection for the following:  injury/negligence/loss to animals in your care; injury to  any persons and/or pets caused by an animal in your care; theft/negligence/damages to clients’ personal belongings and property. You get what you pay for; lower premiums typically mean lesser coverage.
  • Inquire about local, state and federal laws re: business registration and licenses, to ensure you are operating a legitimate business.
  • Build up your references to include both pet parents and professionals.
  • Obtain Animal First Aid/CPR Certification and participate in continuing education. Be prepared for an emergency, as your intervention may very likely save an animal’s life in your care.
  • Allow sufficient time for each pet’s visit or you will compromise the quality of care you provide.
  • If you are uncomfortable with a request for medical care or administration of medication, or have questions, contact the treating veterinarian. I always obtain verification from their vet if medication is to be given in the absence of a current prescription.
  • I would not provide care if it makes you uncomfortable. Trust your instincts if there are red flags and respectfully decline to provide services. That was another piece of advice I was given: You do not have to work with every family that contacts you. The distance may be too far; you may not agree with training techniques; the home may be unsanitary; a family cancels too often or fails to pay for your services. Remember, it’s your business and the choice is yours.
  • Network with other professionals. Observe new situations when possible and be receptive to learning from those willing to help you advance with continuing your education.
  • Develop relationships with veterinarians who foster wellness, are willing to teach you new skills and answer your questions to ensure continuity of care for mutual clients.  I am so thankful for local veterinary practices whom are always willing to help.
  • Establish a presence in your community. Get involved. Help raise awareness and support a local charity. There are various ways to help other than making monetary donations.
  • Make a difference in a family’s life by spending extra time with a beloved pet during end of life, donate your services and provide care from your heart for someone during a crisis, purchase food and supplies for a family in need…show how caring professional pet sitters are by helping a family and their furry loves.
  • If monetary gain far exceeds your desire to create betterment in the care of animals, seek out a different position and leave the hands-on care to others.
  • Always manage your business the way you choose to, rather than being influenced or discouraged by other pet sitters: Hours, rates, growth of your company, remaining a sole-practitioner, services you offer, use of technology, types of payments accepted, are decisions you make.
  • Don’t be afraid to do things differently or bark louder… just make a difference and be puuuurrfectly proud of yourself for becoming a Professional Pet Sitter!!!
“You mentioned mandates of minimum standards for professional pet sitters; can you tell us about that?
 
Due to low standards, lack of ethics and no oversight in pet care, it’s led to gross negligence, often times death.  Early in 2015, I reached out to Assemblyman Troy Singleton for help.  My goal is to have a licensing and certification process implemented for pet sitters.  Assemblyman Singleton was accepted as a co-sponsor of Assembly Bill 2264, Bijou’s Law, and is expanding the Bill to include pet sitters.  Suggestions I provided above have been incorporated and I am hopeful the Bill shall be written into law to elevate the standard of care provided by all professional pet sitters and protect families’ property, personal belongings and precious pets.

How can someone reach you if they have questions?  Do you have a web site?  Are you on Facebook?

I’d love to hear from anyone who has questions!  My web site is http://www.IveGotTheScoop.net and My Facebook Page is http://www.Facebook.com/IveGotTheScoopLLC.

 



PetsitUSA Blog

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TRACIE HOTCHNER: ITCHY DOG? DON’T ALWAYS BLAME THE FOOD! GET THE SPOT TEST!

newtraciepic2Does your dog scratch and lick and/or bite at her ears, feet, flanks or neck? Skin problems are probably the number one reason pet owners go to their vets. I get numerous emails asking for advice and suggestions about resolving skin issues like hot spots, hair loss, and other epidermal problems. Of course fleas are the first logical possibility to eliminate and a topical product is usually going to be the best complete and long term solution.

Myself, I use Vectra 3D for fleas and ticks, but if fleas are not in the equation, then I strongly advise you to get your dog tested for allergies with a SPOT Platinum blood test. I’ve now done it with my two young dogs – who were presumably too young to have developed environmental allergies – however both of their tests showed they had reactivity to different elements in their environment.

They are now each on custom-created oral drops that SPOT Platinum creates, which I squirt in their mouths every day to calm down their sensitivities. There is no more scratching, hives or icky ears.

I recommend the SPOT test not because the Spectrum Company is a proud sponsor of my Radio Pet Lady Network – but because it works! They have been doing allergy testing for a quarter of a century and can reliably screen for 90 elements, including foods, to which your dog may be hyper-sensitive. Just like the allergy injections I get weekly, the oral drops help to desensitize each dog’s individual system so it becomes less reactive.

DFF-logo-ProudSponsor175x166My newly rescued blue Weimaraner Maisie was scratching a lot when I picked her up in Virginia at 9 months of age. I knew she had no fleas. I gave her a nice shower (using Halo’s Cloud Nine herbal shampoo, which makes dog bathing a yummy experience!), but the itching continued.

The vet gave me the common wisdom that it must be a food allergy because she was too young to have developed a reaction to something(s) in her environment. I knew there were exceptions to every rule because when Maisie ran through certain fields and meadows she broke out in hives – and bumps that became sores.

Then along came my puppy Wanda, who began having goopy ears and those moth-eaten coat issues like itching, bumps, or sores when she was only six months old. Even the owner of SPOT Platinum cautioned me that she was too young for the problem to be environmental, it was most likely food.

But I wanted to run the test – I had developed such confidence in it. Lo and behold, Wanda’s allergy to dust mites was off the chart, amongst other reactivities having nothing to do with food.

Takeaway message: don’t be too quick to blame chicken in your dog’s diet, which seems high on everyone’s “guess list” of what causes canine skin problems. Instead, ask your vet to order a SPOT Platinum test kit (if s/he doesn’t already have one in the office) and you may be on your way to a scratch-free existence!
RPLN-NewLogo-ProudSponsor175x197
Tracie Hotchner is the author of THE DOG BIBLE: Everything Your Dog Wants You to Know and THE CAT BIBLE: Everything Your Cat Expects You to Know.

She is also a renowned pet radio host and producer, having spent 7 years on the Martha Stewart Channel of Sirius/XM with CAT CHAT® and even longer with her award-winning NPR radio show DOG TALK® (and Kitties, Too!) that continues to broadcast in the Hamptons and the Berkshires. Her most recent accomplishment is the pet talk radio network she has created on the Internet called The Radio Pet Lady Network.

Halo

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Milou, the GoldenDoodle

This beauty is a GoldenDoodle (a mix of a Golden Retriever and a Poodle) – isn’t she gorgeous.

Milou is only one and a half years old yet so well behaved.  She lives in Munich and was on her way home – just passing through Menton.
RIVIERA DOGS

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George Lopez Adopts Rescue Dog

A rescue dog who got the chance to step into the spotlight at The World Dog Awards has won the role of a lifetime as the canine companion to the TV special’s comic host. Now bringing joy and…



[[ This is a summary only. Click the title for the full post, photos, videos, giveaways, and more! ]]


DogTipper

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Riot police fire tear gas at thousands of protesting shepherds

The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

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Baby Emmett is Here!

Finally! Emmett Hunter Williams was born at 9:22 PM on Saturday, January 9th, after a (much easier than the last time) 12 hours of labor and just 11 minutes of pushing. He was 8 pounds, 10 ounces (I have big babies, man) and 21 inches long. And he is completely amazing. Best of all, his big sister is in love.

Robbie came across the name Emmett one day while searching for baby names and we both loved it. We recently learned Emmett means “whole” or “complete” – pretty perfect considering this little dude officially completes our family. (We gave him the middle name Hunter after his daddy, who also has the middle name Hunter, a family name.) We now have two E’s and can’t wait to start our adventures as a family of four.

I’ll share more (including his birth story, just like I shared Essley’s) eventually, but for now I’m absolutely exhausted and looking forward to having some down time with our new little man during my maternity leave. As I said in my last post, there will continue to be posts here while I’m off, so be sure and stop back by. And thank you for following along on my pregnancy (and now new baby) journey!

ALSO FIND US HERE: BLOGLOVIN’ // INSTAGRAM // FACEBOOK // TWITTER // PINTEREST


Bubby and Bean ::: Living Creatively

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Here We Go! (Baby is On the Way!)

I’ve had this post partly written for over a week now, knowing that I’d be going into labor any day. Well, the time to hit publish has officially arrived you guys. When you read this, I will be in the hospital and Baby Boy will be making his debut (hopefully!) sooner than later. Although I’d rather not repeat the 30 hour labor I had with Essley, as long as he makes it into the world safely, I’ll do what I have to do. The good news is that my body is already progressing and early labor symptoms have started, so I have a good feeling about things.

I’m not sure how long I’ll be in the hospital (last time it was 5 days!), but I do plan on taking a two week maternity leave from the blog and art shop. When Essley was born, I had guest posters filling in during my leave, but this time I’m keeping things a little more casual. There will be a couple of posts from our Lifestyle Contributor Jen, and a few prescheduled posts from me. And I’m sure I’ll be checking in once or twice to introduce our new babe. But for the most part, things will be a little slower than normal over here, and I’ll be sharing more updates over on our Instagram (@bubbyandbean). Once my maternity leave is over, the blog will be back to its regular post schedule.

The next time you hear from me, I’ll be a mother of two, in a family of four. So weird and awesome. I’m so excited! See you soon, friends.

ALSO FIND US HERE: BLOGLOVIN’ // INSTAGRAM // FACEBOOK // TWITTER // PINTEREST


Bubby and Bean ::: Living Creatively

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Jagger

Jagger, a shih-tzu who lives in Nice.
RIVIERA DOGS

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The final kill

003

New Year’s Eve is one of those holidays, where you’re supposed to be at a party or watching a football game. I’m not so big into parties, and I cannot tell you the first thing about football, other than it’s about as exciting as watching the grass grow.

West Virginia’s DNR has blessed the oddballs with a little respite. In parts of the state where the deer population is quite high, part of the split doe season is reopened for the last three days of the year.

I still had a doe tag to fill, so I went to the deer blind. The morning hunt wasn’t so good, but I had my evening planned. At 3 PM, I’d already showered again in my scent-killing wash.

I see more deer in the evening. I think it’s because when I go out in the morning, I’m going out to already active deer, but when I go out in the evening, I’m out there before the deer start to move. West Virginia doesn’t allow hunting at night, so I think it would be pretty hard for me to be in the right spot in the morning and still follow the law.

I settled in. The evening sun began to sink beyond the gray canopy of trees.  No deer yet. It started to get cold. It would be snowing in two days, but right now, it was just enough to be a nuisance.

I knew the deer would come. I knew that there was a doe and fawn pair that always came down the game trail in front of the blind just as the sun began to sink.

So I waited. And I waited. I remained still. Not a bird stirred. Not a squirrel.

In twilight, a doe fawn suddenly materialized. The winter rays of the sun cast a silvery glow to her mousy gray coat.

I didn’t want to take her. She was young, and if winter conditions were good, she’d have a fawn of her own next May or June.

I waited. Not 30 seconds after the fawn materialized. Her mother appeared behind her. A big doe. Maybe 3 or 4 years old.

I’m sure she was the same doe who had blown my cover in the archery season, and now she was quite fat for winter.

I decided to take her. The experts tell us that we should take the mature does to avoid taking button bucks, and taking these larger does also stops her from having twins next year. Thus, taking her is the best way to protect the future antlered deer and to reduce the deer population the next year.

I moved the .243 off safety, and let the two deer move into position. I had put out some corn scented attractant right in front of my blind, where I knew they would stop.

The fawn stopped. Then her mother.

I gently raised the rifle. I had her in my scope sight. I followed the folds on the inside of her elbow until I was dead-centered on her heart.

I took a deep breath and gently squeezed the trigger.

I didn’t hear the gunfire. I heard the bullet slam into the big doe. She spun once and collapsed dead. A clean, humane kill.

If you ever wonder what a gun can do to a man, just look at what one can do to a deer. Nothing will make you respect them more than use one for hunting. They are not toys. They are not absolute evil. But they must be respected.

The gun in question was my grandpa’s old turkey sniper. It is a Remington 788 model, which had painted camouflage.

Turkey hunting with rifles has always been illegal in West Virginia.

So is hunting them with bait.

Gramps followed neither law.

My dad used it to bag a big buck a few years ago.  It’s dead accurate at 75 yards.

But it’s always in the safe. And it’s never brought into the house loaded.

We’re talking a lot about guns this week.

Today, I received an e-mail from the DCCC from a woman whose mother was wounded at the Virginia Tech shooting. I have a cousin who graduated from Virginia Tech, and her father forwarded the same e-mail to me. Guns can ruin lives.

On the other side of the country, a bunch of self-styled militiamen have commandeered a bird sanctuary in Oregon. One of the yahoos appeared on MSNBC covered in a blue tarp demanding that the feds take him there so he could get a better shot at them.

Is this what gun culture has become?

For me, guns are tools of wildlife management, as well as heirlooms passed down from father to son.

To some, they are the very epitome of what it means to be a sovereign American citizen.

To others, they are the sign that America is a barbarous land where the guns crack and the blood spills at all hours of the night.

The truth is I’m not with either of those camps at this moment.

I am reconnected with the old ways, when man hunted the wild beasts for survival.

I’m on a ridgetop in West Virginia, and I’ve sacrificed a white-tail doe to Artemis.

I feel both pride and remorse. I feel pride in that I was able to take the deer humanely, but I feel remorse in that I took a life.

When my grandfather was dying of cancer, he told me that he felt sorry for every squirrel that he wounded but was unable to recover.

And this man was a hunter. A serious one. He loved his guns and hunting dogs.

But he was a predator, not a monster.

When the hunter stops feeling the remorse at the kill, it’s probably time that he or she gave it up.

That remorse comes from valuing life, and it’s the thing that should be at the forefront of one’s mind when you’re holding something as destructive as a gun.

But it’s a fine line between the predator and the monster.

It’s one that I find troubling, but I’m glad that I find it troubling.

I am a person who loves the deer. I am glad our forests are full of them, but I am aware that if they aren’t managed they will eat down all their browse and soon starve to death.

Better to die of a carefully placed bullet than of an empty stomach.

But even that intellectual justification cannot take away the remorse at having killed.

And yet there is still satisfaction.

I am connected to the old ways. I follow in the generations of my species who have thrown spears at quarry, then shot arrows, then musket balls, then these carefully-designed rounds, which can take out a deer so surgically.

I am both awed at the process and humbled by it.

I will continue to hunt the deer. I accept myself as a predator.

But I will not become a monster.

I will always feel that remorse at having killed.

 


Natural History

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