Keeping Up With the Puppies

Whoever raises litters of puppies for fun is crazy.  Last week was a breeze – the puppies would play for a bit, sleep for hours and repeat.

This week is a different story.  They play for hours, sleep for a bit and repeat.  Last week their teeth and jaws were ineffective at destroying anything, this week I’ve caught them gnawing away at the baseboards, electrical cords, shoelaces, and more.  Thankfully only the baseboards have shown any wear, but I’ve got to be on my toes.

Lacey has started to play with them, Coulee thinks we brought them home to torture her.  The cats are pretty indifferent – Jack walks away when they get too close and Lu gives them a gentle (claws in) bop on the head when she’s had enough of their sniffing.  They are pretty respectful puppies and tend to grovel when they are told to back off – which is a good thing.

They are still the cutest things ever.

Oh and did I mention we brought a third one into the mix?  This is Leslie. She is quite a sweetheart and has been doing a good job of keeping the play between all of them a little more balanced.

Its amazing how similar they are, yet there are little differences too.  Leslie was the first to go up the stairs (by a few days) but they can now all go up, but no one can (or at least no one does) go down.

Amy is starting to develop colour patches that I swear weren’t there before.  See that little brown smudge next to her eye?  I thought it was dirt. LOL  Turns out it is brown fur.  She’s got another patch on her back and a tiny hint of black on the edge of one of her ears.

Amy and Bernie will bark a little bit while playing but we’ve never heard Leslie do anything but whine.

Bernie is the first to explore new objects but Leslie is the first to explore new places.  Amy likes to sit back and assess the situation before making her move.

They have quite the speedy little runs now when they want.  When Coulee and Lacey try and get away they tend to have a little pack running behind them.  It is really cute to watch.

After much snarling and posturing, Lacey finally caved to the pressure of the puppies and now plays with them. Her favourite game is when she lays on the couch and they reach up to get her.  She tends to play more with them outside and occasionally tries to take on all three at once.

Bernie likes to sample the grass.  And the leaves.  And anything else she can find.

My favourite time is when they are just about to settle in to sleep.  They have the cutest little gentle play sessions.  Their favourite place is the big West Paw bed in the living room.

It doesn’t matter how hard they try, Coulee is immune to their charms.

We’ve got them for almost 2 more weeks before they go home. They are actually going off to meet their first family tonight.  It’s going to be bittersweet when they leave I think.  I’m going to miss the little gaffers.

Crazy Coulee and Little Lacey

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How do I know when a yeast infection is gone and I can eat a lil sugar again?

Question by dancer8582002: How do I know when a yeast infection is gone and I can eat a lil sugar again?
i think my yeast infection is caused by too much sugar..when do i know for sure it’s ok to eat a little sugar again without the infection coming back?

Best answer:

Answer by eastcoastdebra
If you are prone to yeast infections from eating sugar, it will come back

What do you think? Answer below!

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Michelle Obama Was Seen Today on the White House South Lawn … with Puppies

The news came down at 6:47 a.m. Flotus is on the South Lawn. [Flotus means First Lady of the United States.] Repeat: Flotus is on the South Lawn, with puppies. PUPPIES, dammit. The Internet MUST know. 

And so a tweet issued forth, like a whoosh of puppy breath (or a puppy toot), from one Jennifer Epstein, White House reporter at Politico. She was on the case. She was all over #flotuspuppylawngate. She blasted out the news on Michelle Obama to her 8,000 followers: 

.@flotus hosted a Puppy Bowl training camp at the White House 

And she included this photo:

Share this image



Kee-runch -- that's the sound of one of the gears of the Internet slipping just a tad, as people paused to take in Flotus. On the great lawn. With children. And puppies. 

There's not much to add, other than that it seems that Michelle Obama and a bunch of kids had a very nice morning, cavorting with puppies, throwing down Dick Nixon impressions, playing Hangman on that whiteboard in the back there, and in general having the time of their lives. 

But as for Puppy Bowl training? Those puppies don't look ready. Get your camp in order, Flotus.


The Scoop | The Scoop

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Shorty Rossi to Attend Center for Animal Health and Welfare Fundraiser

Dog devotees are invited to raise their glasses in a toast to our tail-wagging chums as they help to raise funds for a paws cause at the second annual Acoustic Uncorked: Another Doggone Wine Tasting….



[[ This is a summary only. Click the title for the full post, photos, videos, giveaways, and more! ]]


DogTipper: Tips for Dog Lovers

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Solving A Problem With The ABCs

Cutie jumping up.

Let’s look at the ABCs series thus far, especially this post, and see how we can apply the ABCs to solving a real problem.

I started a new basic class this Saturday and a few of the dogs jump up when they meet people, as one might expect for adolescent dogs. In the following class hour, a Canine Good Citizen class, another adolescent had the same issue with the polite greeting test.

I like this problem as an example for the ABCs because the components in the formula are clear and easy to identify.

Antecedent -> Behavior -> Consequence

Person Approaches -> Dog jumps up onto person -> Attention is given to dog

The antecedent is "person approaches". It’s not "dog sees person." This is because the dog cannot be part of the antecedent. In more complex situations the tendency might be to describe an antecedent with the dog included such as "the dog sees another dog" but that won’t work since one of our most powerful measures in solving a problem is controlling the antecedents, either as part of a behavior modification plan or even permanently. It we put the dog in the antecedent we’ve lumped the problem together and solving it becomeS more complicated.

In this case we are going to control the antecedent in two ways: we are going to avoid greetings as much as possible until we can better control them, and while we are training we will carefully control how quickly people approach and how close they will come.

The behavior is the easiest component to identify. The dogs I worked with Saturday were all exuberant "teenagers" that love people and really want to let them know that when they meet them.

After our rather long talk about counter-conditioning and desensitization (go to the category page scroll down a bit) it is worth noting that when we see the relaxed/goofy body postures, wagging tails, and what most observers would call "happy dogs" we know that these dogs are not reacting to the approaching people with fear or aggression and that CC&DS is not what is called for. We don’t want to change how they feel about people, we want to change how they react to them.

The consequence is what often confuses people. For these dogs just getting to the people is reinforcing enough to maintain the behavior. Hugging someone who is holding up their hands and saying "Stop! Get off! Down! Enough!" isn’t reinforcing for us, but that’s not the point. It is for the dog and it is maintaining the behavior.

So how do we apply the formula to this problem?

I already mentioned controlling the antecedent. Obviously this is not a viable long-term strategy. Short term we need to curb greetings because the reinforcement is strengthening the behavior, but this is a temporary step.

In this case changing the consequence is tricky. The only way we could keep the "A" and the "B" and alter the outcome would be to make greeting people unpleasant, and this could have obvious side effects. If we teach the dog that greeting some people results in something bad, he will become wary and maybe even defensive around strangers.

But there is a way to manipulate the situation: if the dog (like most) makes it obvious that he will jump up before the person arrives, we can have them stop or move away when he does this. This is the common "red light/green light" or "yo-yo" drill that many trainers use in classes. Done effectively, it actually becomes a way to use DRI to fix this problem.

  1. Our dog is on leash, held by his owner. Sitting at his side.
  2. Person approaches, dog gets out of sit. Person turns (dramatically if possible) and walks away.
  3. Repeat several times.
  4. Eventually, person approaches, dogs holds sit! Person continues to approach. When very close dog gets up. Person moves away.
  5. Eventually, person approaches, dog holds sit all the way until person reaches team and can greet human.

This is obviously an ideal scenario, mainly because I didn’t want to write another 500 words just describing the scenario. (I need to film this with a green dog and then edit the heck out of it.)

By starting with a sit and using getting up it as the criteria for having the person move away we focused on what we wanted instead of what we didn’t want.

Sometimes having the handler reward the dog with food is appropriate. Sometimes it adds to the dog’s excitement and makes things worse. Sometimes it even takes the dog’s focus completely off the exercise. It depends. In this rosy scenario attention was the main reinforcer and I went with it.

How long did it take? With the dog in the CGC class I was able to actually do this procedure in a few minutes. But this was a dog that had already passed a basic class and had a strong history of reinforcement for sitting. Pick a behavior that your dog is already proficient at when using this kind of problem solving.

What problems have you had success with solving? What problems have you stumped? What do you think of this approach to problem solving? Let me know in the comments!

Also, have you joined my email list yet? Every week I send an update on new posts to the blog, with a few extra notes from me. I’d love to have you onboard!

Solving A Problem With The ABCs is a post written by . You can see the actual post at Dog Training in Bergen County New Jersey


Dog Spelled Forward Website and Blog

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Nice Infection photos

A few nice infection images I found:

Heartwood infection
infection

Image by Scot Nelson

Infection
infection

Image by Profound Whatever
Not in cruelty, not in wrath,
The Reaper came that day;
‘Twas an angel visited this red earth,
And took the crew away.

- – – -

Yes, a bit Waters of Mars inspired.

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The Look!

This is a dog I saw at the Kermesse in Monaco in December.  She was walking around with another dog – and their owner, of course. There were so many people around at this moment that I didn’t ask her name. What a look she is giving me!

Is she a whippet or a greyhound. Looks too big for a whippet perhaps?
RIVIERA DOGS

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THE RIPPLE: Chapter 1: Man Plans. God Laughs. Dogs Poop

In the first week of launching the Austin to Boston walk in 2008, the whole weight of universal forces bore down on us like the wrath; a swift and unforgiving maelstrom that tested our mettle absolutely.  
——–
First there was the crippling weight of my pack because I didn’t want to be caught on the road without some essential tool, doo-dad, device or sundry to assuage the uncertain world I had just thrown myself into.  
Though I made a pact with God to get me and my boys to Boston safely didn’t mean I didn’t have a backup plan. Or two.  
Hudson and Murphy’s safety was of paramount concern to me and I packed for it. Shit, I carried enough medical supplies to run triage in a war zone.  I had a secondary leash that could counter as a tourniquet, micro flasks of iodine and isopropyl alcohol, and gauze pads of all sizes and shapes.   
A NOAA radio, batteries of all flavors, my clunky Dell laptop, and a seven iron to ground against lightening strikes and guard us from gophers, golfers, or god knows what.  
I barely made it five miles the first two days and even though I was in supreme physical condition, the weight of my pack almost became walk ending.  My lower back was already badly damaged from a work injury and later a car wreck and the sheer act of lifting my overloaded 5500 cc Osprey tweaked it even further. 
——–
And then the skies unleashed their fury.
Scientists say that of all of the senses, smell has the longest memory.  For example, you’ll never forget the acrid, stinging stench of a skunk.  That’s true, but I’ll never forget two sounds.  
One of which is the shrilling of my NOAA radio warning followed by the voice of the Atari Man, the nom de plume I assigned to that analog version of a linesman casting weather forecasts like a Pong match.  
Tornado warning. Wind speeds up to 50 mph.  Freezing hail.  Flash flooding.   Seek shelter.  
And indeed, Atari Man called it right.  Lightening storms and unrelenting rain opened up all around us and it got so bad that we abandoned our $ 20 Walmart tent off the northbound side of 973 for the underbelly of a nearby bridge.  
Clearly, this wasn’t the way I planned it.  
And that was just for starters.  
Fire ants, crazy sponsors, a lost bag, forgotten antibiotics, bad burritos, and a mad cow man followed in that first week. 
——–
YBD’s Notes 1:  I have a good friend going through a tough patch and in her words, she’s in ‘Protection Mode’.  

There are some things in life for which there is no shelter and if it wasn’t for the proverbial kitchen sink being thrown at us the first week of our walk, we would have never made it.  

I remember with perfect clarity in the tent with my boys what made the difference.  

YBD’s Notes 2: Early on, I had to understand which weight to shoulder and which to shrug.  That wisdom carries forth to our second walk.  

YBD’s Notes 3:  Very few things are worse than being in a bad bad storm when your dogs gotta poop.

2 Dogs 2,000 Miles

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Treating a Dog With Bad Behavior

Dealing with bad behavior from your dog can be a problem that may seem at times to be too much to handle. Your dog may begin disobeying you in small ways, but that can easily transform into more aggressive actions and poor habits if you don’t put a stop to it.

The key to treating a dog with bad behavior is to learn what is causing your dog to misbehave and that can help you find a solution.

Most pet dogs like to be included in all your activities since they feel as if they are part of the family. Ignoring them or leaving them out of most of your family events can cause separation anxiety, resulting in unacceptable behavior.

Dogs going through their adolescent period will normally try to rebel against your usual routines. If your dog refuses to let you put on its leash or refuses to sit when commanded, it’s an indication that your dog is trying to better its ranking as an alpha dog. In other words, the dog is trying to one-up you in the game of “who’s in charge here.” Giving your pet firm commands while remaining calm will show it who’s in charge and help control its bad behavior.

If you’ve recently acquired a normally calm and friendly breed like a Labrador Retriever or Golden Retriever and it suddenly attacks another dog or a person, the problem is not a simple behavioral issue. Aggressive acts and unpredictable behavior like this usually indicates poor breeding practices. It can also be due to several other reasons such as puppies feeling pain from teething, feeling threatened, feeling pain from an injury, prior abuse, or a female dog that is in heat. If your dog is a puppy and nips or bites at you, saying “no” very strongly will usually startle it into quitting the disagreeable behavior.

A dog with bad behavior is not appreciated by anyone. When dogs become overly excited, especially small dogs, they often tend to urinate uncontrollably. This may happen when you begin playing with your dog or when a visitor, whether a stranger or frequent guest, comes into your house. This behavior can typically be traced to the fact that a dog is not being walked and exercised enough and its stored up energy results in urination problems. If you punish your dog and it doesn’t understand what it did wrong, it may urinate out of sheer nervousness.

Begging stems from natural instinct, improper socialization, boredom or desire for your attention. To stop this bad behavior feed your dog on a regular schedule and don’t give it snacks in between meals. Always ignore your dog when it begs.

Chewing on objects is part of the natural teething process in puppies. It may also be attributed to boredom, separation anxiety, undernourishment, or lack of sufficient exercise. If your adult dog is an obsessive chewer, you can put a little hot pepper sauce, or vinegar and hot mustard on items the dog should not be chewing and the taste will be enough to discourage that bad behavior. If your dog is chewing on items that can’t be coated with one of these substances, Petco and PetSmart have products to prevent unwanted chewing of objects.

Having your dog jump on you whenever you arrive home may seem cute, but most friends and guests won’t appreciate the enthusiastic behavior, especially if your dog is a larger breed. Consistently discourage the practice at the first signs of this behavior by voicing a firm “no.” To discourage such behavior, ignore your dog and avoid eye contact when it jumps on you. Tell your dog to “sit” and then reward it with a treat when it obeys. Daily exercise also helps to reduce the dog’s excess energy.

Treating a dog with bad behavior, especially an adult dog will be a lot easier if you think of your dog as being like a two year-old child. It needs to be trained and constantly reminded of what is proper behavior and what is not.

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LightPainting “Scratch”

A few nice Pet Scratch images I found:

LightPainting “Scratch”
Pet Scratch

Image by Terry Bain
if you itch

Terry Bain || author
You Are a Dog | blog || We Are the Cat (forthcoming 2006) | blog

sundries || You Are a Dog People | We Are the Cat People | Adoptable Pets | of books | LightPainting | food pr0n

Puppy Lovin’
Pet Scratch

Image by Deannster

My favourite pet
Pet Scratch

Image by rogiro
I actually played with this junior tiger. He was really sweet, loved my jeans to scratch his nails in.
Visited him in South Africa, on a farm with a lot of lions, Lynx and tigres.

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