Bulldogs are Beautiful Day

It’s been said that every dog has his day. For Bulldogs that day is April 21st, when animal lovers celebrate Bulldogs are Beautiful Day! To mark the occasion, here are a few fun facts about one…



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DogTipper

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Whole Lot of Difference: Kitten Rescue

Kitten Rescue

Kitten Rescue is a non-profit, volunteer-run organization devoted to finding loving homes for unwanted, homeless cats and kittens. They rescue cats and kittens from the streets of Los Angeles and from City Shelter euthanasia. Since their start in 1997, they have grown into one of the largest, most well-respected animal welfare groups in LA.

Halo is proud to partner with Freekibble.com and GreaterGood.org to make a WHOLE lot of difference for shelter pets together.

Kitten Rescue received the donation thanks to a Halo partnership with social influencer White Coffee Cat, who has 1.4 million Instagram followers and almost 500,000 Facebook fans.

White Coffee Cat

Here’s what Kitten Rescue had to say about their recent Halo donation:

Snoop is a staff and volunteer favorite at the Sanctuary. He is a high energy, curious, quirky two-year-old kitty. He loves to find new places to explore, climbing, burrowing, looking at you from on top of shelves and chirping sweetly as he is doing it all. Snoop has had corrective surgery to fix eye lashes that were growing inward and he also has an eye condition called coloboma, which means that his irises did not develop normally, but not to worry – this condition does not need any extra attention. He really is an awesome cat, and we’re hoping to find the perfect, loving home for him. Your grant helped us feed Sanctuary kitties like Snoop!

Snoop

At the Kitten Rescue Sanctuary, we have many special needs and senior cats, whose chances for adoption are slim. We provide lifetime care, filled with love and companionship for them here. The food provided for us, helps us care for these cats and provide them with great nutrition to keep them healthy. Champ is one of those kitties. He originally came to Kitten Rescue when he was trapped at a feral colony in 2003 and it was discovered that Champ wasn’t feral at all! He was adopted soon after, but was returned in 2010 with another cat after his owners were divorced. Champ’s birthday is this month and he will be 19 years old!”

Champ

Thank you Kitten Rescue and White Coffee Cat for making a WHOLE lot of difference for pets in your community.

Halo has now added even more WHOLE meat, poultry or fish and use OrigiNative™ (humanely sourced) Proteins, saying “NO” to factory farming, growth hormones, antibiotics, artificial flavors, colors, or preservatives. And all our fruits and vegetables are now Non-GMO – sourced from farmland that prohibits the use of Genetically Modified Seeds.

Halo feeds it forward, donating over 1.5 million bowls annually. As always, Halo will donate a bowl to a shelter every time YOU buy. Thank you for helping #HaloFeeditForward

Halo Pets

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  Weiner dog museum opens

The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

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Get Working Dogs From Shelters – Not From European Breeders!

K9 Hercules is part of our partnership Grant program with Animal Farm Foundation

Photo by Universal K9

Why does the United States military – and various police departments around the country – continue to spend tens of thousands of dollars per dog to buy potential working dogs from Eastern Europe?

Not long ago on DOG TALK® I spoke to Dr. Karen Overall at the University of Pennsylvania vet school on the topic of the high cost to our police departments and military of continuing their practice of buying untrained dogs from overseas. Dr. Overall is overseeing a program to breed high quality working dogs right here in the U.S. However, this will take some time to get up and running as a reliable source of these much-needed canine workers.

Brad Croft Founder of Universal K9Right now, there’s someone doing something with rapid results to bring more working canines into the community – while saving the lives of dogs in shelters. Brad Croft thinks we’re wasting valuable money and time in the United States when our shelters are full of canine candidates that can be transitioned to work with the military or a police force. Croft founded Universal K9, a company that  identifies dogs in shelters who would be good prospects for police work – especially those high-drive, high energy dogs who didn’t work out as family pets.  Where purebred young dogs imported from Europe cost $ 10,000-$ 20,000 each (and still require extensive training), Croft says dogs from shelters are an inexpensive and highly effective resource to help combat crime. Each shelter selects dogs to be donated to the program based on their personality traits.Traditionally, the Universal K9 detection dogs cost approximately $ 3,000-$ 6,000 each, factoring in the professional training period that usually takes 8 weeks.

This week on DOG TALK®  I talked to Brad Croft about how he goes to shelters seeking these high-drive dogs and shapes them into valuable working dogs. Universal K9 exists solely to save dogs from shelters to train them for law enforcement and detection work, as well as for military veterans.

Brad also runs the Detection Dog Program at Animal Farm Foundation, where their mission is to secure equal treatment and opportunity for “pit bull” dogs, many of which Brad has taken from Animal Farm Foundation to transition into important work with law enforcement. Using AFF’s philosophy that all dogs are individuals and should not be categorized because of their breed, Universal K9 trains the dogs to prepare them to work with police departments helping them detect drugs, explosives, and weapons.  Universal K9 has already placed 46 of these dogs from the Animal Farm Foundation Detection Dog Program into the field in a number of police departments across the country, where they are assisting police officers in fighting crime – while getting a new lease on life.

Tracie HotchnerTracie Hotchner is a nationally acclaimed pet wellness advocate, who wrote THE DOG BIBLE: Everything Your Dog Wants You to Know and THE CAT BIBLE: Everything Your Cat Expects You to Know. She is recognized as the premiere voice for pets and their people on pet talk radio. She continues to produce and host her own Gracie® Award winning NPR show DOG TALK®  (and Kitties, Too!) from Peconic Public Broadcasting in the Hamptons after 9 consecutive years and over 500 shows. She produced and hosted her own live, call-in show CAT CHAT® on the Martha Stewart channel of Sirius/XM for over 7 years until the channel was canceled, when Tracie created her own Radio Pet Lady Network where she produces and co-hosts CAT CHAT® along with 10 other pet talk radio podcasts with top veterinarians and pet experts.

Dog Film Festival - Tracie HotchnerTracie also is the Founder and Director of the annual NY Dog Film Festival, a philanthropic celebration of the love between dogs and their people. Short canine-themed documentary, animated and narrative films from around the world create a shared audience experience that inspires, educates and entertains. With a New York City premiere every October, the Festival then travels around the country, partnering in each location with an outstanding animal welfare organization that brings adoptable dogs to the theater and receives half the proceeds of the ticket sales. Halo was a Founding Sponsor in 2015 and donated 10,000 meals to the beneficiary shelters in every destination around the country in 2016.

Tracie lives in Bennington, Vermont – where the Radio Pet Lady Network studio is based – and where her 12 acres are well-used by her 2-girl pack of lovely, lively rescued Weimaraners, Maisie and Wanda.

Halo Pets

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12 Delightfully Easy Avocado-Based Recipes

Summertime Watermelon and Feta Guacamole Dip

You already know all about my long time love affair with all things avocado, so I’ll skip the gushing and just leave you with this round up of my favorite recipes from over the years here at Bubby and Bean that incorporate avocado and happen to be incredibly easy to prepare. Click on any of the images or links below them to see the recipes in full. I’m getting hungry just looking at them.

Cheddar + Swiss, Fuji Apple, and Avocado Sandwich
Guacamole and Black Bean Pizza (via Bubby and Bean)
Jasmine Rice, Lentil, and Red Quinoa Tacos
Southwestern Style Mac and Cheese // Bubby and Bean
Individual Mexican Style Layer Dips
Avocado and Pan Toasted Chickpea Pitas
Festive Winter Guacamole
Vegetarian Breakfast Tacos with Red and Yellow Potatoes

If you’ve made any of these, I’d love to hear which was your favorite. And if there are any recipes staring my beloved avocado that you think I simply must try, please leave links in the comments or shoot me an email!

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Bubby and Bean ::: Living Creatively

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The jackals and the cheetah and a glimpse of how dog domestication may have happened

kenya black-backed jackal

We think of interactions between predators as always antagonistic.  Meat is hard to come by, and if one comes by meat on the hoof, it is unlikely that the owner-operator of said flesh will give it up willingly.   Meat is a prized food source, and it is little wonder that most predators spend quite a bit of energy driving out competitors from hunting grounds.

Because of this antagonism, the domestication of wolves by ancient hunter-gatherers is difficult to explain. Indeed, the general way of getting wolves associated with people is see them as scavengers that gradually evolved to fear our species less.

This idea is pretty heavily promoted in the dog domestication literature, for it is difficult for experts to see how wolves could have been brought into the human fold any other way.

But there are still writers out there who posit a somewhat different course for dog domestication.  Their main contentions are that scavengers don’t typically endear themselves to those from which they are robbing, and further, the hunter-gatherers of the Pleistocene did not produce enough waste to maintain a scavenging population of wolves.

It is virtually impossible to recreate the conditions in which some wolves hooked up with people. With the exception of those living on the some the Queen Elizabeth Islands, every extant wolf population has been persecuted heavily by man. Wolves generally avoid people, and there has been a selection pressure through our centuries of heavy hunting for wolves to have extreme fear and reactivity. It is unlikely that the wolves that were first encountered on the Mammoth Steppe were shy and retiring creatures. They would have been like the unpersecuted wolves of Ellesmere, often approaching humans with bold curiosity.

As I have noted in an earlier post, those Ellesmere wolves are an important population that have important clues to how dog domestication might have happened, but the truth of the matter is that no analogous population of wolves or other wild canids exists in which cooperation with humans is a major part of the survival strategy. The wolves on Ellesmere are not fed by anyone, but they don’t rely upon people for anything.

But they are still curious about our species, and their behavior is so tantalizing. Yet it is missing that cooperative analogy that might help us understand more.

I’ve searched the literature for this analogy. I’ve come up short every time. The much-celebrated cooperation between American badgers and coyotes is still quite controversial, and most experts now don’t believe the two species cooperate.  Instead, they think the badger goes digging for ground squirrels, and the coyote stand outside the burrow entrance waiting for the prey to bolt out as the badger’s digging approaches its innermost hiding place in the den. The coyote gets the squirrel, and the badger wastes energy on its digging.

But there is a story that is hard to dispute. It has only been recorded once, but it is so tantalizing that I cannot ignore it.

Randall Eaton observed some rather unusual behavior between black-backed jackals and cheetahs in Nairobi National Park in 1966.

Both of these species do engage in cooperative hunting behavior. Black-backed jackals often work together to hunt gazelles and other small antelope, and they are well-known to work together to kill Cape fur seal pups on Namibia’s Skeleton Coast. Male cheetahs form coalitions that work together to defend territory and to hunt cooperatively.

However, the two species generally have a hostile relationship. Cheetahs do occasionally prey upon black-backed jackals, and black-backed jackals will often mob a cheetah after it has made a kill, in hopes of forcing the cat to abandon all that meat.

So these animals usually cannot stand each other, and their interactions are not roseate in the least. Eaton described the “normal interaction” as follows:

The normal interaction between these two predators occurs when the jackals hunt in the late afternoon and come into a group of cheetahs. The jackals, often four or five, are normally spread out over several hundred yards and maintain contact by barking as they move. When cheetahs are encountered by one of the jackals, it barks to the others and they all come to the cheetahs, sniffing the air as they approach apparently looking for a kill. If the cheetahs are not on a kill, the jackals search the immediate area looking for a carcass that might have just been left by the cheetahs. If nothing is found, they remain near the cheetahs for some time, following them as they move ; and when a kill is made the jackals feed on the leftover carcass. If the cheetahs have already fed and are inactive and if a carcass is not found nearby, the jackals move on.

However, Eaton discovered that one particular group of jackals and one female cheetah had developed a different strategy:

At the time I was there in November, 1966, one area of the park was often frequented by a female cheetah with four cubs and was also the territory of a pair of jackals with three pups. The jackal young remained at the den while the adults hunted either singly or together. Upon encountering the cheetah family, the jackals approached to about 20 yards and barked but were ignored except for an occasional chase by the cubs. The jackals ran back and forth barking between the cheetahs and a herd of Grant’s gazelles (Gazella granti) feeding nearby. The two jackals had gone on to hunt and were almost out of sight by the time the adult cheetah attacked two male Grant’s gazelles that had grazed away from the herd. The hunt was not successful. The jackals took notice of the chase and returned to look for a kill ; it appeared that they associated food with the presence of the cheetahs and perhaps with the chase.

One month later, while observing the same cheetah family, I noticed that the entire jackal family was hunting as a group. The cheetah and her cubs were about 300 yards from a herd of mixed species. This same herd had earlier spotted the cheetahs and given alarm calls. The adult cheetah was too far away for an attack,there was little or no stalking cover and the herd was aware of her presence. The cheetahs had been lying in the shade for about one-half an hour since the herd spotted them when the jackals arrived. Upon discovering the cheetahs lying under an Acacia tree, one of the adult jackals barked until the others were congregated around the cheetah family. The jackal that had found the cheetahs crawled to within ten feet of the adult cheetah which did not respond. The jackal then stood up and made a very pneumatic sound by forcing air out of the lungs in short staccato bursts. This same jackal turned towards the game herd, ran to it and, upon reaching it, ran back and forth barking. The individuals of the herd watched the jackal intently. The cheetah sat up and watched the herd as soon as it became preoccupied with the activity of the jackal. Then the cheetah quickly got up and ran at half-speed toward the herd, getting to within 100 yards before being seen by the herd. The prey animals then took flight while the cheetah pursued an impala at full speed.

Upon catching the impala and making the kill, the cheetah called to its cubs to come and eat. After the cheetahs had eaten their fill and moved away from the carcass, the waiting jackals then fed on the remains.

Eaton made several observations of this jackal family working with this female cheetah, and by his calculations, the cheetah was twice as successful when the jackals harassed the herds to aid her stalk.

Eaton made note of this behavior and speculated that this sort of cooperative hunting could have been what facilitated dog domestication:

If cheetah and jackal can learn to hunt mutually then it is to be expected that man’s presence for hundreds, of thousands of years in areas with scavenging canines would have led to cooperative hunting between the two. In fact, it is hard to believe otherwise. It is equally possible that it was man who scavenged the canid and thereby established a symbiosis. Perhaps this symbiosis facilitated the learning of effective social hunting by hominids. Selection may have favored just such an inter-specific cooperation.

Agriculture probably ended the importance of hunting as the binding force between man and dog and sponsored the more intensive artificial selection of breeds for various uses. It is possible that until this period men lived closely with canids that in fossil form are indistinguishable from wild stock (Zeuner, 1954).

Domestication may have occurred through both hunting symbiosis and agricultural life; however, a hunting relationship probably led to the first domestication. Fossil evidence may eventually reconstruct behavioral associations between early man and canids.

Wolves are much more social and much more skilled as cooperative hunters than black-backed jackals are. Humans have a complex language and a culture through which techniques and technology can be passed from generation to generation.

So it is possible that a hunting relationship between man and wolf in the Paleolithic could have been maintained over many generations.

The cheetah had no way of teaching her cubs to let the jackals aid their stalks, and one family of jackals is just not enough to create a population of cheetah assistants.

But humans and these unpersecuted Eurasian wolves of the Pleistocene certainly could create these conditions.

I imagine that the earliest wolf-assisted hunts went much like these jackal-cheetah hunts. Wolves are always testing prey to assess weakness. If a large deer species or wild horse is not weak, it will stand and confront the wolves, and in doing so, it would be exposing itself to a spear being thrown in its direction.

If you’ve ever tried a low-carbohydrate diet, you will know that your body will crave fat. Our brains require quite a bit of caloric intake from fat to keep us going, which is one of those very real costs of having such a large brain. Killing ungulates that stood to fight off wolves meant that would target healthy animals in the herds, and healthy animals have more fat for our big brains.

Thus, working together with wolves would give those humans an advantage, and the wolves would be able to get meat with less effort.

So maybe working together with these Ellesmere-like wolves that lived in Eurasia during the Paleolithic made us both more effective predators, and unlike with the cheetah and the black-backed jackals, human intelligence, language, and cultural transmission allowed this cooperation to go on over generations.

Eaton may have stumbled onto the secret of dog domestication. It takes more than the odd population of scavenging canids to lay the foundations for this unusual domestication. Human agency and foresight joined with the simple cooperative nature of the beasts to make it happen.

 

 

 

Natural History

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Olympian Gus Kenworthy Rescues Almost 100 Dogs

Gus Kenworthy and Dog Beemo

Photo Credit: Instagram/GusKenworthy

 

Gus Kenworthy is known for being an incredibly skilled skier. However, he has won the hearts of many for his love of animals and dedication to using his fame to help animals in need. According to the Humane Society International, while Gus was in PeyongChang for the Olympics, he also took the time to visit a dog meat farm in South Korea where he helped rescue almost 100 dogs!

The HSI reports that eating dogs “is unpopular with young Koreans” but there are still an estimated 2.5 million dogs living in awful conditions on roughly 17,000 dog meat farms in South Korea. Gus wrote on Instagram that “it’s not my place to impose western ideals on the people here,” but that the “way these animals are being treated, however, is completely inhumane and culture should never be a scapegoat for cruelty.” He and HSI also understand that you can’t simply tell people to stop engaging in a problematic economic practice, without introducing something more sustainable.

In this case, the farmer of this farm has worked with HSI and will now grow mushrooms for food, rather than breeding dogs. It’s a win-win for the dogs and for the farmer. The more than 1,200 dogs HSI has rescued over the past three years have better lives with families in the United Kingdom, Canada, and the United States. The farmers have new livelihoods that are not only more sustainable, but more humane. Gus shared that he thinks “it’s a very practical solution to a highly emotive problem” and helping the farmers as well as the dogs.

Gus Kenworthy and Humane Society International

Photo Credit: Instagram/Humane Society International

 

One particular dog from Gus’s visit is especially lucky. He’s a little pup that Gus named Beemo. Gus and his boyfriend, actor Matt Wilkas, fell in love with Beemo while they were helping HSI on the farm. Because of that, Beemo will be joining them as the newest member of their family! Beemo might not be gold, or even silver, but we bet that Gus prefers him to anything else he could have brought back from PeyongChang. In return, we’re sure that Beemo is grateful to his new dads. We hope Gus and Matt are continuing to stand up for the humane treatment of animals by giving Beemo Halo dog food and treats. Halo proudly displays the logo of the Humane Society of the United States (sister organization to HSI) on our packaging. In addition to supporting the HSUS Animal Rescue Team, we also support the All Animals mission of HSUS by working to make sure all animals are treated humanely. If we gave gold medals, we’d definitely give one to Gus for being a true hero for animals.

Halo Pets

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Once an abused puppy, new police dog finds important job on UC Berkeley campus

The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

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Friday Funny: United Nations of Dogs

Have a great weekend! Until next time, Good day, and good dog!


Doggies.com Dog Blog

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Target’s New Travel Inspired Home Line is Everything

Target Opalhouse Collection

I feel like such a basic suburban soccer mom (which I guess I kind of am these days, despite telling myself I’m still the hip urban 25 year old I’ve been in my head for more years than I care to admit) constantly professing my love for Target, but hey – I love it. In terms of errand running, they’ve usually got everything I need. But they also have great style, and they continue to outdo themselves. My jaw may have even dropped a little when I was first introduced to their new furniture and home decor collection, Opalhouse. It’s a bohemian traveler’s dream, and I am so excited for it to drop (this Sunday, April 8th). Apparently Target’s design team traveled to Paris, Lisbon, and Mallorca for inspiration, and I believe it. I thought I’d share some glimpses of it with you guys today, since I’m having trouble containing my excitement.

Target Opalhouse Collection
Target Opalhouse Collection
Target Opalhouse Collection
Target Opalhouse Collection

I am especially smitten with the Canyon Sunrise collection because it is freaking gorgeous. My shopping list includes this macrame table runner ($ 24.99), this colorful pom pom lumbar pillow ($ 19.99), this gorgeous rattan ceiling light ($ 59.99), this carved wood tray ($ 24.99), this super affordable cotton macrame wall hanging ($ 29.99), this super cute and practical pom basket ($ 19.99), this tasseled bath mat ($ 24.99) which is genuinely the most beautiful bath mat I’ve ever seen, and this stunning rattan chair ($ 139.99).

Target Opalhouse Collection
Target Opalhouse Collection
Target Opalhouse Collection
Target Opalhouse Collection

And if the design alone wasn’t enough to make me want to reach for my wallet the second these items become available on Sunday, most pieces in the collection are under $ 30. I am IN.

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Bubby and Bean ::: Living Creatively

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