Developing fruits of Erect Hedgeparsley, Upright Hedge Parsley, Japanese Hedge Parsley,Torilis japonica …..Trái của hoa Thiết Y, Tô-li ….#1

A few nice scabies images I found:

Developing fruits of Erect Hedgeparsley, Upright Hedge Parsley, Japanese Hedge Parsley,Torilis japonica …..Trái của hoa Thiết Y, Tô-li ….#1
scabies

Image by Vietnam Plants & The USA. plants
Taken in Hewitt, Waco, Texas ( Around 4 :00 pm in May 3, 2012 ) . This plant was also found in Sa-pa, Northern Viet Nam.

Cây cũng đã được tìm thấy ở Sa Pa, miền Bắc Viet Nam ( anh Hai Le ), theo thông tin của tổ chức Pfaf thì lá có thể ăn được bằng cách nấu, rể thì gọt vỏ bỏ đi và phần thịt bên trong có thể ăn tươi. Chưa có thông tin nào về hạt có thể ăn được nhưng nó có rất nhiều chất béo và protein ( 16 – 21% protein and 10 – 23% fat ) . Và hạt của cây Torilis japonica đã được dùng ở Korea để trị các chứng bệnh : Chứng quên ( amnesia ) , dị ứng gây ngứa ( pruritus ), acidosis ( chứng thừa hay thiếu acid ? ) và bệnh ghẻ (scabies ). Nước ép của rể được dùng để trị chứng khó tiêu ( indigestion ) — tạm dịch theo thông tin của Pfaf .

Vietnamese named : Tô – Li, Thiết Y
Common names : Erect Hedgeparsley, Upright Hedge Parsley, Japanese Hedge Parsley.
Scientist name : Torilis japonica (Houtt.) DC.
Synonyms :
Family : Apiaceae
KingdomPlantae – Plants
SubkingdomTracheobionta – Vascular plants
SuperdivisionSpermatophyta – Seed plants
DivisionMagnoliophyta – Flowering plants
ClassMagnoliopsida – Dicotyledons
SubclassRosidae
OrderApiales
FamilyApiaceae – Carrot family
GenusTorilis Adans. – hedgeparsley
SpeciesTorilis japonica (Houtt.) DC. – erect hedgeparsley

**** plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=toja

**** ontariowildflowers.com/main/species.php?id=126

**** www.missouriplants.com/Whitealt/Torilis_japonica_page.html

**** www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Torilis+japonica

Torilis japonica is a ANNUAL growing to 1 m (3ft 3in). It is in flower from Jul to August, and the seeds ripen from Aug to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects, self.The plant is self-fertile.

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and requires well-drained soil.The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade.It requires dry or moist soil.

Habitats
Hedgerow;
Edible Uses
Edible Parts: Leaves; Root.

Leaves – cooked[105, 177]. Root – peeled and eaten raw[105, 177]. Although we have no record of the seed being edible, there is a report that it contains 16 – 21% protein and 10 – 23% fat[218].

Medicinal Uses

Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.

Expectorant; Tonic.

The seed is anthelmintic, antifungal, antiviral, expectorant and tonic[218, 279]. It is used in Korea in the treatment of amnesia, pruritis, acidosis and scabies[279]. The juice of the root is used in the treatment of indigestion[272].

Links / References
[17]Clapham, Tootin and Warburg. Flora of the British Isles.
A very comprehensive flora, the standard reference book but it has no pictures.
[105]Tanaka. T. Tanaka’s Cyclopaedia of Edible Plants of the World.
The most comprehensive guide to edible plants I’ve come across. Only the briefest entry for each species, though, and some of the entries are more than a little dubious. Not for the casual reader.
[177]Kunkel. G. Plants for Human Consumption.
An excellent book for the dedicated. A comprehensive listing of latin names with a brief list of edible parts.
[218]Duke. J. A. and Ayensu. E. S. Medicinal Plants of China
Details of over 1,200 medicinal plants of China and brief details of their uses. Often includes an analysis, or at least a list of constituents. Heavy going if you are not into the subject.
[272]Manandhar. N. P. Plants and People of Nepal
Excellent book, covering over 1,500 species of useful plants from Nepal together with information on the geography and peoples of Nepal. Good descriptions of the plants with terse notes on their uses.
[279] Medicinal Plants in the Republic of Korea
An excellent book with terse details about the medicinal uses of the plants with references to scientific trials. All plants are described, illustrated and brief details of habitats given.

**** www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19533579

Planta Med. 2009 Nov;75(14):1505-8. Epub 2009 Jun 16.
Torilin from Torilis japonica inhibits melanin production in alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone-activated B16 melanoma cells.
Yun CY, Kim D, Lee WH, Park YM, Lee SH, Na M, Jahng Y, Hwang BY, Lee MK, Han SB, Kim Y.
Source
College of Pharmacy & Research Center for Bioresource and Health, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Korea.
Abstract
Epidermal melanocytes synthesize melanin pigments and transfer them to keratinocytes, which is responsible for skin pigmentation. However, abnormal accumulation of melanin pigments causes hyperpigmentation disorders, which are substantially improved with treatment of tyrosinase inhibitor. In our ongoing study, Torilis japonica DC. (Umbelliferae) was found to inhibit melanin production. A goal of this study is to elucidate the hypopigmenting principle of T. japonica. A sesquiterpene structure of torilin was isolated from the plant extracts via bioassay-guided phytochemical analysis. Torilin dose-dependently inhibited melanin production, with an IC(50) value of 25 microM, in alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH)-activated B16 melanoma cells. Arbutin, a positive control of skin whitener, also inhibited alpha-MSH-induced melanin production with an IC(50) value of 170 microM. As to the mode of action, torilin downregulated alpha-MSH-induced protein levels of tyrosinase without directly inhibiting catalytic activity of the enzyme. Taken together, this study shows that torilin contributes to the hypopigmenting principle of T. japonica, and suggests its pharmacological potential in melanin-associated hyperpigmentation disorders.
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.
PMID: 19533579 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

**** www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=3&taxon_id=2…
Torilis japonica (Houtt.) DC.
小窃衣
Description from Flora of China
Caucalis japonica Houttuyn, Nat. Hist. 2(8): 42. 1777; Anthriscus vulgaris Bernhardi; C. anthriscus (Linnaeus) Hudson; C. coniifolia Wallich ex de Candolle; C. elata D. Don; C. praetermissa (Hance) Franchet; Tordylium anthriscus Linnaeus; Torilis anthriscus (Linnaeus) C. C. Gmelin (1805), not (Linnaeus) Gaertner (1788); T. anthriscus var. japonica (Houttuyn) H. de Boissieu; T. praetermissa Hance.
Chaerophyllum scabrum Thunberg in Murray, Syst. Veg., ed. 14, 289. 1784; Anthriscus scabra (Thunberg) Koso-Poljansky; Caucalis scabra (Thunberg) Makino; Torilis henryi C. Norman.
Herbs 20–120 cm tall. Basal and lower cauline leaves petiolate; petiole 2–7 cm; blade triangular-ovate to ovate-lanceolate in outline, up to 20 × 17 cm; pinnae ovate-lanceolate, 2–6 × 1–2.5 cm. Peduncles 3–25 cm, retrorse hispid; bracts few, linear; rays 4–12, 1–3 cm spreading, bristly; bracteoles 5–8, linear or subulate, 1.5–7 × 0.5–1.5 mm; umbellules 4–12-flowered. Pedicels 1–4 mm, shorter than bracteoles. Calyx teeth small, deltoid-lanceolate. Fruit often blackish purple when mature, globose-ovoid, 1.5–5 × 1–2.5 mm. Fl. and fr. Apr–Oct.
The roots and fruits are used medicinally in some provinces.
Mixed forests in valleys, grassy places, especially in disturbed areas; 100–3800 m. Throughout China, except Heilongjiang, Nei Mongol, and Xinjiang [widespread as a ruderal in Asia and Europe].

Erect Hedgeparsley, Upright Hedge Parsley, Japanese Hedge Parsley,Torilis japonica ‘s flowers …#9
scabies

Image by Vietnam Plants & The USA. plants
Taken in Hewitt, Waco, Texas ( Around 4 :00 pm in May 3, 2012 ) . This plant was also found in Sa-pa, Northern Viet Nam.

Cây cũng đã được tìm thấy ở Sa Pa, miền Bắc Viet Nam ( anh Hai Le ), theo thông tin của tổ chức Pfaf thì lá có thể ăn được bằng cách nấu, rể thì gọt vỏ bỏ đi và phần thịt bên trong có thể ăn tươi. Chưa có thông tin nào về hạt có thể ăn được nhưng nó có rất nhiều chất béo và protein ( 16 – 21% protein and 10 – 23% fat ) . Và hạt của cây Torilis japonica đã được dùng ở Korea để trị các chứng bệnh : Chứng quên ( amnesia ) , dị ứng gây ngứa ( pruritus ), acidosis ( chứng thừa hay thiếu acid ? ) và bệnh ghẻ (scabies ). Nước ép của rể được dùng để trị chứng khó tiêu ( indigestion ) — tạm dịch theo thông tin của Pfaf .

Vietnamese named : Tô – Li, Thiết Y
Common names : Erect Hedgeparsley, Upright Hedge Parsley, Japanese Hedge Parsley.
Scientist name : Torilis japonica (Houtt.) DC.
Synonyms :
Family : Apiaceae
KingdomPlantae – Plants
SubkingdomTracheobionta – Vascular plants
SuperdivisionSpermatophyta – Seed plants
DivisionMagnoliophyta – Flowering plants
ClassMagnoliopsida – Dicotyledons
SubclassRosidae
OrderApiales
FamilyApiaceae – Carrot family
GenusTorilis Adans. – hedgeparsley
SpeciesTorilis japonica (Houtt.) DC. – erect hedgeparsley

**** plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=toja

**** ontariowildflowers.com/main/species.php?id=126

**** www.missouriplants.com/Whitealt/Torilis_japonica_page.html

**** www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Torilis+japonica

Torilis japonica is a ANNUAL growing to 1 m (3ft 3in). It is in flower from Jul to August, and the seeds ripen from Aug to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects, self.The plant is self-fertile.

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and requires well-drained soil.The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade.It requires dry or moist soil.

Habitats
Hedgerow;
Edible Uses
Edible Parts: Leaves; Root.

Leaves – cooked[105, 177]. Root – peeled and eaten raw[105, 177]. Although we have no record of the seed being edible, there is a report that it contains 16 – 21% protein and 10 – 23% fat[218].

Medicinal Uses

Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.

Expectorant; Tonic.

The seed is anthelmintic, antifungal, antiviral, expectorant and tonic[218, 279]. It is used in Korea in the treatment of amnesia, pruritis, acidosis and scabies[279]. The juice of the root is used in the treatment of indigestion[272].

Links / References
[17]Clapham, Tootin and Warburg. Flora of the British Isles.
A very comprehensive flora, the standard reference book but it has no pictures.
[105]Tanaka. T. Tanaka’s Cyclopaedia of Edible Plants of the World.
The most comprehensive guide to edible plants I’ve come across. Only the briefest entry for each species, though, and some of the entries are more than a little dubious. Not for the casual reader.
[177]Kunkel. G. Plants for Human Consumption.
An excellent book for the dedicated. A comprehensive listing of latin names with a brief list of edible parts.
[218]Duke. J. A. and Ayensu. E. S. Medicinal Plants of China
Details of over 1,200 medicinal plants of China and brief details of their uses. Often includes an analysis, or at least a list of constituents. Heavy going if you are not into the subject.
[272]Manandhar. N. P. Plants and People of Nepal
Excellent book, covering over 1,500 species of useful plants from Nepal together with information on the geography and peoples of Nepal. Good descriptions of the plants with terse notes on their uses.
[279] Medicinal Plants in the Republic of Korea
An excellent book with terse details about the medicinal uses of the plants with references to scientific trials. All plants are described, illustrated and brief details of habitats given.

**** www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19533579

Planta Med. 2009 Nov;75(14):1505-8. Epub 2009 Jun 16.
Torilin from Torilis japonica inhibits melanin production in alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone-activated B16 melanoma cells.
Yun CY, Kim D, Lee WH, Park YM, Lee SH, Na M, Jahng Y, Hwang BY, Lee MK, Han SB, Kim Y.
Source
College of Pharmacy & Research Center for Bioresource and Health, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Korea.
Abstract
Epidermal melanocytes synthesize melanin pigments and transfer them to keratinocytes, which is responsible for skin pigmentation. However, abnormal accumulation of melanin pigments causes hyperpigmentation disorders, which are substantially improved with treatment of tyrosinase inhibitor. In our ongoing study, Torilis japonica DC. (Umbelliferae) was found to inhibit melanin production. A goal of this study is to elucidate the hypopigmenting principle of T. japonica. A sesquiterpene structure of torilin was isolated from the plant extracts via bioassay-guided phytochemical analysis. Torilin dose-dependently inhibited melanin production, with an IC(50) value of 25 microM, in alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH)-activated B16 melanoma cells. Arbutin, a positive control of skin whitener, also inhibited alpha-MSH-induced melanin production with an IC(50) value of 170 microM. As to the mode of action, torilin downregulated alpha-MSH-induced protein levels of tyrosinase without directly inhibiting catalytic activity of the enzyme. Taken together, this study shows that torilin contributes to the hypopigmenting principle of T. japonica, and suggests its pharmacological potential in melanin-associated hyperpigmentation disorders.
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.
PMID: 19533579 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

**** www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=3&taxon_id=2…
Torilis japonica (Houtt.) DC.
小窃衣
Description from Flora of China
Caucalis japonica Houttuyn, Nat. Hist. 2(8): 42. 1777; Anthriscus vulgaris Bernhardi; C. anthriscus (Linnaeus) Hudson; C. coniifolia Wallich ex de Candolle; C. elata D. Don; C. praetermissa (Hance) Franchet; Tordylium anthriscus Linnaeus; Torilis anthriscus (Linnaeus) C. C. Gmelin (1805), not (Linnaeus) Gaertner (1788); T. anthriscus var. japonica (Houttuyn) H. de Boissieu; T. praetermissa Hance.
Chaerophyllum scabrum Thunberg in Murray, Syst. Veg., ed. 14, 289. 1784; Anthriscus scabra (Thunberg) Koso-Poljansky; Caucalis scabra (Thunberg) Makino; Torilis henryi C. Norman.
Herbs 20–120 cm tall. Basal and lower cauline leaves petiolate; petiole 2–7 cm; blade triangular-ovate to ovate-lanceolate in outline, up to 20 × 17 cm; pinnae ovate-lanceolate, 2–6 × 1–2.5 cm. Peduncles 3–25 cm, retrorse hispid; bracts few, linear; rays 4–12, 1–3 cm spreading, bristly; bracteoles 5–8, linear or subulate, 1.5–7 × 0.5–1.5 mm; umbellules 4–12-flowered. Pedicels 1–4 mm, shorter than bracteoles. Calyx teeth small, deltoid-lanceolate. Fruit often blackish purple when mature, globose-ovoid, 1.5–5 × 1–2.5 mm. Fl. and fr. Apr–Oct.
The roots and fruits are used medicinally in some provinces.
Mixed forests in valleys, grassy places, especially in disturbed areas; 100–3800 m. Throughout China, except Heilongjiang, Nei Mongol, and Xinjiang [widespread as a ruderal in Asia and Europe].

Flowers of Erect Hedgeparsley, Upright Hedge Parsley, Japanese Hedge Parsley,Torilis japonica…#8
scabies

Image by Vietnam Plants & The USA. plants
Taken in Hewitt, Waco, Texas ( Around 4 :00 pm in May 3, 2012 ) . This plant was also found in Sa-pa, Northern Viet Nam.

Cây cũng đã được tìm thấy ở Sa Pa, miền Bắc Viet Nam ( anh Hai Le ), theo thông tin của tổ chức Pfaf thì lá có thể ăn được bằng cách nấu, rể thì gọt vỏ bỏ đi và phần thịt bên trong có thể ăn tươi. Chưa có thông tin nào về hạt có thể ăn được nhưng nó có rất nhiều chất béo và protein ( 16 – 21% protein and 10 – 23% fat ) . Và hạt của cây Torilis japonica đã được dùng ở Korea để trị các chứng bệnh : Chứng quên ( amnesia ) , dị ứng gây ngứa ( pruritus ), acidosis ( chứng thừa hay thiếu acid ? ) và bệnh ghẻ (scabies ). Nước ép của rể được dùng để trị chứng khó tiêu ( indigestion ) — tạm dịch theo thông tin của Pfaf .

Vietnamese named : Tô – Li, Thiết Y
Common names : Erect Hedgeparsley, Upright Hedge Parsley, Japanese Hedge Parsley.
Scientist name : Torilis japonica (Houtt.) DC.
Synonyms :
Family : Apiaceae
KingdomPlantae – Plants
SubkingdomTracheobionta – Vascular plants
SuperdivisionSpermatophyta – Seed plants
DivisionMagnoliophyta – Flowering plants
ClassMagnoliopsida – Dicotyledons
SubclassRosidae
OrderApiales
FamilyApiaceae – Carrot family
GenusTorilis Adans. – hedgeparsley
SpeciesTorilis japonica (Houtt.) DC. – erect hedgeparsley

**** plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=toja

**** ontariowildflowers.com/main/species.php?id=126

**** www.missouriplants.com/Whitealt/Torilis_japonica_page.html

**** www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Torilis+japonica

Torilis japonica is a ANNUAL growing to 1 m (3ft 3in). It is in flower from Jul to August, and the seeds ripen from Aug to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects, self.The plant is self-fertile.

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and requires well-drained soil.The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade.It requires dry or moist soil.

Habitats
Hedgerow;
Edible Uses
Edible Parts: Leaves; Root.

Leaves – cooked[105, 177]. Root – peeled and eaten raw[105, 177]. Although we have no record of the seed being edible, there is a report that it contains 16 – 21% protein and 10 – 23% fat[218].

Medicinal Uses

Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.

Expectorant; Tonic.

The seed is anthelmintic, antifungal, antiviral, expectorant and tonic[218, 279]. It is used in Korea in the treatment of amnesia, pruritis, acidosis and scabies[279]. The juice of the root is used in the treatment of indigestion[272].

Links / References
[17]Clapham, Tootin and Warburg. Flora of the British Isles.
A very comprehensive flora, the standard reference book but it has no pictures.
[105]Tanaka. T. Tanaka’s Cyclopaedia of Edible Plants of the World.
The most comprehensive guide to edible plants I’ve come across. Only the briefest entry for each species, though, and some of the entries are more than a little dubious. Not for the casual reader.
[177]Kunkel. G. Plants for Human Consumption.
An excellent book for the dedicated. A comprehensive listing of latin names with a brief list of edible parts.
[218]Duke. J. A. and Ayensu. E. S. Medicinal Plants of China
Details of over 1,200 medicinal plants of China and brief details of their uses. Often includes an analysis, or at least a list of constituents. Heavy going if you are not into the subject.
[272]Manandhar. N. P. Plants and People of Nepal
Excellent book, covering over 1,500 species of useful plants from Nepal together with information on the geography and peoples of Nepal. Good descriptions of the plants with terse notes on their uses.
[279] Medicinal Plants in the Republic of Korea
An excellent book with terse details about the medicinal uses of the plants with references to scientific trials. All plants are described, illustrated and brief details of habitats given.

**** www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19533579

Planta Med. 2009 Nov;75(14):1505-8. Epub 2009 Jun 16.
Torilin from Torilis japonica inhibits melanin production in alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone-activated B16 melanoma cells.
Yun CY, Kim D, Lee WH, Park YM, Lee SH, Na M, Jahng Y, Hwang BY, Lee MK, Han SB, Kim Y.
Source
College of Pharmacy & Research Center for Bioresource and Health, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Korea.
Abstract
Epidermal melanocytes synthesize melanin pigments and transfer them to keratinocytes, which is responsible for skin pigmentation. However, abnormal accumulation of melanin pigments causes hyperpigmentation disorders, which are substantially improved with treatment of tyrosinase inhibitor. In our ongoing study, Torilis japonica DC. (Umbelliferae) was found to inhibit melanin production. A goal of this study is to elucidate the hypopigmenting principle of T. japonica. A sesquiterpene structure of torilin was isolated from the plant extracts via bioassay-guided phytochemical analysis. Torilin dose-dependently inhibited melanin production, with an IC(50) value of 25 microM, in alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH)-activated B16 melanoma cells. Arbutin, a positive control of skin whitener, also inhibited alpha-MSH-induced melanin production with an IC(50) value of 170 microM. As to the mode of action, torilin downregulated alpha-MSH-induced protein levels of tyrosinase without directly inhibiting catalytic activity of the enzyme. Taken together, this study shows that torilin contributes to the hypopigmenting principle of T. japonica, and suggests its pharmacological potential in melanin-associated hyperpigmentation disorders.
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.
PMID: 19533579 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

**** www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=3&taxon_id=2…
Torilis japonica (Houtt.) DC.
小窃衣
Description from Flora of China
Caucalis japonica Houttuyn, Nat. Hist. 2(8): 42. 1777; Anthriscus vulgaris Bernhardi; C. anthriscus (Linnaeus) Hudson; C. coniifolia Wallich ex de Candolle; C. elata D. Don; C. praetermissa (Hance) Franchet; Tordylium anthriscus Linnaeus; Torilis anthriscus (Linnaeus) C. C. Gmelin (1805), not (Linnaeus) Gaertner (1788); T. anthriscus var. japonica (Houttuyn) H. de Boissieu; T. praetermissa Hance.
Chaerophyllum scabrum Thunberg in Murray, Syst. Veg., ed. 14, 289. 1784; Anthriscus scabra (Thunberg) Koso-Poljansky; Caucalis scabra (Thunberg) Makino; Torilis henryi C. Norman.
Herbs 20–120 cm tall. Basal and lower cauline leaves petiolate; petiole 2–7 cm; blade triangular-ovate to ovate-lanceolate in outline, up to 20 × 17 cm; pinnae ovate-lanceolate, 2–6 × 1–2.5 cm. Peduncles 3–25 cm, retrorse hispid; bracts few, linear; rays 4–12, 1–3 cm spreading, bristly; bracteoles 5–8, linear or subulate, 1.5–7 × 0.5–1.5 mm; umbellules 4–12-flowered. Pedicels 1–4 mm, shorter than bracteoles. Calyx teeth small, deltoid-lanceolate. Fruit often blackish purple when mature, globose-ovoid, 1.5–5 × 1–2.5 mm. Fl. and fr. Apr–Oct.
The roots and fruits are used medicinally in some provinces.
Mixed forests in valleys, grassy places, especially in disturbed areas; 100–3800 m. Throughout China, except Heilongjiang, Nei Mongol, and Xinjiang [widespread as a ruderal in Asia and Europe].

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Baby Is On the Way! (+ Big Holiday Giveaway Winner)

Baby is on the way!

Well, it’s official.  My pregnancy-induced high blood pressure (read more about that here) isn’t cooperating, and it looks like baby girl is going to make her official debut sometime tomorrow.  (What?  It’s really happening?  Is this real life?!)  I head to the hospital this evening to begin the induction process, which will kick into full gear tomorrow morning.  I am simultaneously bursting with fear and excitement, anxiety and pure joy.  She may be coming early, but it feels like I’ve been ready to meet her forever. 

I’m not sure exactly when I’ll be returning to the blog full time, but starting Monday, I’ll have some incredible guest posters filling in.  Please stop back by to show them some love.  If it weren’t for them, we’d be shutting Bubby and Bean down for at least a couple of weeks, so I really appreciate your support of them.  I’m so excited for you guys to see all the goodness they have to share.  And I will stop in with updates along the way (and baby photos!) as I am able, after we’re home and recovered.   I’ll also do my best to update when she is born on Instagram (@bubbyandbean) and Twitter (@motm_ecofashion).

And last but not least, the winner of the Big Holiday Giveaway as chosen via random.org is:

Congratulations Jess!  Please contact me at bubbyandbean (AT) gmail.com to discuss getting you your prizes.  (With the baby coming earlier than expected, please allow up to a week for me to get back to you.)

For those who celebrated, I hope you had a wonderful Christmas.  The next time you hear from me, I will be a mother!

Follow Bubby and Bean

Bubby and Bean on Bloglovin


Bubby and Bean ::: Living Creatively

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Maggie and Mia

We’ve met Maggie and Mia before.  Maggie, on the left, is a red and white Irish setter – she lives in Monaco.  Mia is one of my rescue dogs – she’s a Bassett Ariegois (a French hunting dog) and is the scared one, scared of people that is.  She loves other dogs and as you can see is checking out Maggie who is giving her a very strange look …
RIVIERA DOGS

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Counter-Conditioning and Desensitization for Dogs (Part 3)

Basic Graduation 2-14-12

Last week I described the counter-condition and desensitization process (CC&DS). When is it the right approach, as opposed to addressing a problem with reward-based training?

Deciding that an association is causing your dog to behave a certain way means making assumptions about what is going on "inside" the dog. These kinds of assumptions are not always right. As a matter of fact, these kinds of assumptions are what can lead to describing a dog as stubborn, dumb, or even the dreaded (and horribly misused) "dominant." Which is not a personality attribute dammit. But I digress…

With the understanding that we are making judgements based on our dog’s body language and behavior there is a general rule we can follow. We use CC&DS to change an undesirable response to a stimulus that seems to be driven by a negative reaction to the stimulus. Let’s consider three possible responses to a human stranger approaching a dog:

  1. The dog attempts to escape.
  2. The dog lunges, growls, barks, in what we would characterize as an aggressive manner.
  3. The dog attempts to jump up and greet the person.

In numbers one and two the dog’s reaction is negative. Both reactions are likely driven by fear. In number three his reaction is positive – he is happy to see the person and wants to greet them, albeit in an inappropriate manner.

We need to change the emotional response in scenarios one and two. A dog that is attempting to flee or attack cannot be taught to greet someone politely, and even if it were possible, he would probably still be distressed. We want to make him more comfortable. This is job for CC&DS.

In scenario three the dog is happy to see people! We certainly don’t want to change that. We have a training problem: we need to teach him how to greet people politely.

In situations where we need to make something "bad" become something "good" (or at least a lot less bad) we use CC&DS. In a situation where something is already good but the response is what is "bad" we use training.

That’s it for CC&DS in this series. Next week we move on to a new chapter in the ABC’s.

But before we move on, here’s a cute video illustrating how classical conditioning works. I wish I had found it when I started this series.

Counter-Conditioning and Desensitization for Dogs (Part 3) is a post written by . You can see the actual post at Dog Training in Bergen County New Jersey


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Is there any way to relieve my puppy from mange/intense scratching because of it?

Question by lia: Is there any way to relieve my puppy from mange/intense scratching because of it?
My puppy is 3 months old and is infected with Sarcoptic mange. The vet has been treating her for 3 weeks now, although she’s a little better, she still whines and cries when she scratches. It breaks my heart to see her like this.

Best answer:

Answer by Karenlouise
Antibiotics
One potential course of treatment for mange is antibiotics. These are to be applied topically to the affected area. While this won’t get rid of the mange, per se, it will help to reduce infection and inflammation caused by the mange. If patches of hairless skin are red or swollen, an antibiotic is a good way to speed healing.
Insecticide
In some causes, a mild insecticide can be used on mange. There are special formulations made specifically for dogs that are safe for your pup and kill the mites. One such example is Rotenone, which is contained in shampoos or creams and often helps to speed up hair growth.
Mitaban
Using a substance called amitraz, or Mitaban, can help significantly to treat mange when it has spread all over your dog’s body. Only puppies over four months old can be treated with this monoamine oxidase inhibitor and will likely require the cutting or shaving of fur in the affected areas.
Anti-Parasitics
Another treatment option is the use of an anti-parasitic drug like Interceptor. This drug is taken orally and is intended to help reduce the number or mange outbreaks. This is only recommended for mange treatment if your puppy experiences regular mite infestations.
Dog’s Itchy Skin? www.PoochandMutt.com/BionicBiotic
Why Your Dog Itches + How To Treat. Vet recommended supplement.

Give your answer to this question below!

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Is “No Kill Mondays” a Practical Action, or a Publicity Ploy?

I think that we can take it as a given that we all want to see fewer dogs killed, especially in shelters. If you’re a regular reader of this site, you know that we’re big advocates of people adopting from shelters instead of buying a dog from the local pet store or breeder. We especially love groups that help rescue and adopt out the dogs that usually get passed over, such as our beloved Muttville.

All that being said, I have to confess to a certain skepticism about the No Kill Mondays program being promoted by a nonprofit called Animals Vote.

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Mondays seem even harsher when you’re scheduled to be put down. But is being euthanized on Tuesday all that much better? Stray dogs in the shelter by Shutterstock.

The name says it all: Animals Vote has assembled a list of 2,500 shelters across the country that euthanize animals, and are asking them to pledge that every Monday from now on will be a no-kill day. At first glance, that looks great. How could anyone who cares for animals be against shelters promising not to kill them?

The thing is that I've gone over Animals Vote's press release several times with a careful (albeit slightly jaded), and I can't see how No Kill Mondays does anything beyond providing some empty symbolism while allowing Animals Vote to posture righteously.

While it might be great that shelters wouldn't be euthanizing animals on Monday, they can (and will) take up the slack on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday. In other words, committing to the No Kill Monday program is actually a promise to do some bureaucratic shuffling, rather than to make any actual change in policy. Dogs and cats would still die, but they'd do it a day or two later.

I think it would be great to see no-kill shelters to become the rule, rather than the exception. But to do that requires a lot of changes. It requires that shelters get the material support they need in order to house, feed, and humanely care for large numbers of animals without killing them. It requires that the public start thinking of shelters as a primary source for a new pet, rather than the place you go when you can't afford to drop cash at a breeder or a pet store. It requires that owners themselves become a lot more educated about how to take care of their pet so that they don't wind up lingering in a shelter to begin with.

One big first step towards reducing shelter populations would be if microchips were to become a holy sacrament of all pet owners. And it would help a lot, too, if people were willing to adopt older or disabled dogs, rather than thinking of cute, adorable puppies as the gold standard. Once again, this brings me back to the fantastic work that Muttville does.

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A solution to euthanization needs to be more than just shuffling dates and papers. Business archive in folders by Shutterstock.

To their credit, Animals Vote admits that this is only the first step of a solution. Their press release calls ending euthanasia "a complex issue," and claims "the initiative will bring forth a national conversation around peaceful methods of managing homeless pets." However, they also claim that "AnimalsVote.org has put forth a multi-stage program enumerated in a series of articles, titled 'The Three Laws.' In combination, the changes espoused will end killing with minimal budgetary impact."

What are The Three Laws? I have no idea. You see, you're not allowed to read articles or comments on their site unless you register on the site. That brings me to another reason that my spidey-sense tingles like a four-alarm fire around the No Kill Mondays program. In order to find out what Animals Vote's ideas for practical action are, or to read their agenda in depth, I have to give them my personal info.

It's one thing when a for-profit site like The New York Times demands you sign up to read their articles. Their content is there primarily to make money. But when you're a nonprofit, getting the ideas in those articles out into the real world is pretty much your reason for existing. Making your potential readers turn over their info just seems shady. At this point, I know little about about Animals Vote beyond what I could glean from their About page, their press release, and Twitter.

In the last few decades, there have been some remarkable steps made in reducing the number of animals killed in shelters. No-kill shelters, while not quite the default, are no longer considered an oddity. And an increasing number of cities are officially banning the sale of dogs from puppy mills. Even so, there are still far too many dogs and cats who are put down every year. When we take action to reduce those numbers, we have to make sure that what we do counts in the long run, instead of giving animals a 24-hour reprieve.

What do you think? Would the No Kill Mondays program achieve anything real? Or is it just good public relations for shelters who keep on euthanizing?

Via Animals Vote and PRNewswire


The Scoop | The Scoop

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Merry Christmas from Chuck Norris, the clever world of CGI and…

… the Poodles, the dogs, the cat and Jan Words by Shakespeare Music by Enya If the video doesnt play, click here.
The Poodle (and Dog) Blog

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Pile of fleas! Nice infestation.

I don’t know if these are fleas or not. Found them in my basement. The cat was playing with them…There must be 50000 or so. Never seen anything like it. M…

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Wishing Everyone a Very Happy Holiday!

On Wednesday, we’re stepping away from the computer to enjoy some family time, a long dog walk, and the joy of the holidays. We want to wish all of you a very happy holiday and to thank you for…



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DogTipper

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Adoptable Dog of the Day: Lacey in Alabama

Lacey is an adult female Australian Shepherd & Labrador Retriever mix currently in the care of The Animal Shelter (Calhoun County Humane Society) in Anniston, AL. Lacey is a sweet dog who loves…



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DogTipper

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