Leaves and flowers of Erect Hedgeparsley, Upright Hedge Parsley, Japanese Hedge Parsley,Torilis japonica…#7

Check out these scabies images:

Leaves and flowers of Erect Hedgeparsley, Upright Hedge Parsley, Japanese Hedge Parsley,Torilis japonica…#7
scabies

Image by Vietnam Plants & The USA. plants
Taken in Hewitt, Waco, Texas ( Around 4 :00 pm in May 3, 2012 ) . This plant was also found in Sa-pa, Northern Viet Nam.

Cây cũng đã được tìm thấy ở Sa Pa, miền Bắc Viet Nam ( anh Hai Le ), theo thông tin của tổ chức Pfaf thì lá có thể ăn được bằng cách nấu, rể thì gọt vỏ bỏ đi và phần thịt bên trong có thể ăn tươi. Chưa có thông tin nào về hạt có thể ăn được nhưng nó có rất nhiều chất béo và protein ( 16 – 21% protein and 10 – 23% fat ) . Và hạt của cây Torilis japonica đã được dùng ở Korea để trị các chứng bệnh : Chứng quên ( amnesia ) , dị ứng gây ngứa ( pruritus ), acidosis ( chứng thừa hay thiếu acid ? ) và bệnh ghẻ (scabies ). Nước ép của rể được dùng để trị chứng khó tiêu ( indigestion ) — tạm dịch theo thông tin của Pfaf .

Vietnamese named : Tô – Li, Thiết Y
Common names : Erect Hedgeparsley, Upright Hedge Parsley, Japanese Hedge Parsley.
Scientist name : Torilis japonica (Houtt.) DC.
Synonyms :
Family : Apiaceae
KingdomPlantae – Plants
SubkingdomTracheobionta – Vascular plants
SuperdivisionSpermatophyta – Seed plants
DivisionMagnoliophyta – Flowering plants
ClassMagnoliopsida – Dicotyledons
SubclassRosidae
OrderApiales
FamilyApiaceae – Carrot family
GenusTorilis Adans. – hedgeparsley
SpeciesTorilis japonica (Houtt.) DC. – erect hedgeparsley

**** plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=toja

**** ontariowildflowers.com/main/species.php?id=126

**** www.missouriplants.com/Whitealt/Torilis_japonica_page.html

**** www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Torilis+japonica

Torilis japonica is a ANNUAL growing to 1 m (3ft 3in). It is in flower from Jul to August, and the seeds ripen from Aug to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects, self.The plant is self-fertile.

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and requires well-drained soil.The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade.It requires dry or moist soil.

Habitats
Hedgerow;
Edible Uses
Edible Parts: Leaves; Root.

Leaves – cooked[105, 177]. Root – peeled and eaten raw[105, 177]. Although we have no record of the seed being edible, there is a report that it contains 16 – 21% protein and 10 – 23% fat[218].

Medicinal Uses

Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.

Expectorant; Tonic.

The seed is anthelmintic, antifungal, antiviral, expectorant and tonic[218, 279]. It is used in Korea in the treatment of amnesia, pruritis, acidosis and scabies[279]. The juice of the root is used in the treatment of indigestion[272].

Links / References
[17]Clapham, Tootin and Warburg. Flora of the British Isles.
A very comprehensive flora, the standard reference book but it has no pictures.
[105]Tanaka. T. Tanaka’s Cyclopaedia of Edible Plants of the World.
The most comprehensive guide to edible plants I’ve come across. Only the briefest entry for each species, though, and some of the entries are more than a little dubious. Not for the casual reader.
[177]Kunkel. G. Plants for Human Consumption.
An excellent book for the dedicated. A comprehensive listing of latin names with a brief list of edible parts.
[218]Duke. J. A. and Ayensu. E. S. Medicinal Plants of China
Details of over 1,200 medicinal plants of China and brief details of their uses. Often includes an analysis, or at least a list of constituents. Heavy going if you are not into the subject.
[272]Manandhar. N. P. Plants and People of Nepal
Excellent book, covering over 1,500 species of useful plants from Nepal together with information on the geography and peoples of Nepal. Good descriptions of the plants with terse notes on their uses.
[279] Medicinal Plants in the Republic of Korea
An excellent book with terse details about the medicinal uses of the plants with references to scientific trials. All plants are described, illustrated and brief details of habitats given.

**** www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19533579

Planta Med. 2009 Nov;75(14):1505-8. Epub 2009 Jun 16.
Torilin from Torilis japonica inhibits melanin production in alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone-activated B16 melanoma cells.
Yun CY, Kim D, Lee WH, Park YM, Lee SH, Na M, Jahng Y, Hwang BY, Lee MK, Han SB, Kim Y.
Source
College of Pharmacy & Research Center for Bioresource and Health, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Korea.
Abstract
Epidermal melanocytes synthesize melanin pigments and transfer them to keratinocytes, which is responsible for skin pigmentation. However, abnormal accumulation of melanin pigments causes hyperpigmentation disorders, which are substantially improved with treatment of tyrosinase inhibitor. In our ongoing study, Torilis japonica DC. (Umbelliferae) was found to inhibit melanin production. A goal of this study is to elucidate the hypopigmenting principle of T. japonica. A sesquiterpene structure of torilin was isolated from the plant extracts via bioassay-guided phytochemical analysis. Torilin dose-dependently inhibited melanin production, with an IC(50) value of 25 microM, in alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH)-activated B16 melanoma cells. Arbutin, a positive control of skin whitener, also inhibited alpha-MSH-induced melanin production with an IC(50) value of 170 microM. As to the mode of action, torilin downregulated alpha-MSH-induced protein levels of tyrosinase without directly inhibiting catalytic activity of the enzyme. Taken together, this study shows that torilin contributes to the hypopigmenting principle of T. japonica, and suggests its pharmacological potential in melanin-associated hyperpigmentation disorders.
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.
PMID: 19533579 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

**** www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=3&taxon_id=2…
Torilis japonica (Houtt.) DC.
小窃衣
Description from Flora of China
Caucalis japonica Houttuyn, Nat. Hist. 2(8): 42. 1777; Anthriscus vulgaris Bernhardi; C. anthriscus (Linnaeus) Hudson; C. coniifolia Wallich ex de Candolle; C. elata D. Don; C. praetermissa (Hance) Franchet; Tordylium anthriscus Linnaeus; Torilis anthriscus (Linnaeus) C. C. Gmelin (1805), not (Linnaeus) Gaertner (1788); T. anthriscus var. japonica (Houttuyn) H. de Boissieu; T. praetermissa Hance.
Chaerophyllum scabrum Thunberg in Murray, Syst. Veg., ed. 14, 289. 1784; Anthriscus scabra (Thunberg) Koso-Poljansky; Caucalis scabra (Thunberg) Makino; Torilis henryi C. Norman.
Herbs 20–120 cm tall. Basal and lower cauline leaves petiolate; petiole 2–7 cm; blade triangular-ovate to ovate-lanceolate in outline, up to 20 × 17 cm; pinnae ovate-lanceolate, 2–6 × 1–2.5 cm. Peduncles 3–25 cm, retrorse hispid; bracts few, linear; rays 4–12, 1–3 cm spreading, bristly; bracteoles 5–8, linear or subulate, 1.5–7 × 0.5–1.5 mm; umbellules 4–12-flowered. Pedicels 1–4 mm, shorter than bracteoles. Calyx teeth small, deltoid-lanceolate. Fruit often blackish purple when mature, globose-ovoid, 1.5–5 × 1–2.5 mm. Fl. and fr. Apr–Oct.
The roots and fruits are used medicinally in some provinces.
Mixed forests in valleys, grassy places, especially in disturbed areas; 100–3800 m. Throughout China, except Heilongjiang, Nei Mongol, and Xinjiang [widespread as a ruderal in Asia and Europe].

Flowers of Erect Hedgeparsley, Upright Hedge Parsley, Japanese Hedge Parsley,Torilis japonica…#10
scabies

Image by Vietnam Plants & The USA. plants
Taken in Hewitt, Waco, Texas ( Around 4 :00 pm in May 3, 2012 ) . This plant was also found in Sa-pa, Northern Viet Nam.

Cây cũng đã được tìm thấy ở Sa Pa, miền Bắc Viet Nam ( anh Hai Le ), theo thông tin của tổ chức Pfaf thì lá có thể ăn được bằng cách nấu, rể thì gọt vỏ bỏ đi và phần thịt bên trong có thể ăn tươi. Chưa có thông tin nào về hạt có thể ăn được nhưng nó có rất nhiều chất béo và protein ( 16 – 21% protein and 10 – 23% fat ) . Và hạt của cây Torilis japonica đã được dùng ở Korea để trị các chứng bệnh : Chứng quên ( amnesia ) , dị ứng gây ngứa ( pruritus ), acidosis ( chứng thừa hay thiếu acid ? ) và bệnh ghẻ (scabies ). Nước ép của rể được dùng để trị chứng khó tiêu ( indigestion ) — tạm dịch theo thông tin của Pfaf .

Vietnamese named : Tô – Li, Thiết Y
Common names : Erect Hedgeparsley, Upright Hedge Parsley, Japanese Hedge Parsley.
Scientist name : Torilis japonica (Houtt.) DC.
Synonyms :
Family : Apiaceae
KingdomPlantae – Plants
SubkingdomTracheobionta – Vascular plants
SuperdivisionSpermatophyta – Seed plants
DivisionMagnoliophyta – Flowering plants
ClassMagnoliopsida – Dicotyledons
SubclassRosidae
OrderApiales
FamilyApiaceae – Carrot family
GenusTorilis Adans. – hedgeparsley
SpeciesTorilis japonica (Houtt.) DC. – erect hedgeparsley

**** plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=toja

**** ontariowildflowers.com/main/species.php?id=126

**** www.missouriplants.com/Whitealt/Torilis_japonica_page.html

**** www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Torilis+japonica

Torilis japonica is a ANNUAL growing to 1 m (3ft 3in). It is in flower from Jul to August, and the seeds ripen from Aug to September. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Insects, self.The plant is self-fertile.

The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and requires well-drained soil.The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade.It requires dry or moist soil.

Habitats
Hedgerow;
Edible Uses
Edible Parts: Leaves; Root.

Leaves – cooked[105, 177]. Root – peeled and eaten raw[105, 177]. Although we have no record of the seed being edible, there is a report that it contains 16 – 21% protein and 10 – 23% fat[218].

Medicinal Uses

Plants For A Future can not take any responsibility for any adverse effects from the use of plants. Always seek advice from a professional before using a plant medicinally.

Expectorant; Tonic.

The seed is anthelmintic, antifungal, antiviral, expectorant and tonic[218, 279]. It is used in Korea in the treatment of amnesia, pruritis, acidosis and scabies[279]. The juice of the root is used in the treatment of indigestion[272].

Links / References
[17]Clapham, Tootin and Warburg. Flora of the British Isles.
A very comprehensive flora, the standard reference book but it has no pictures.
[105]Tanaka. T. Tanaka’s Cyclopaedia of Edible Plants of the World.
The most comprehensive guide to edible plants I’ve come across. Only the briefest entry for each species, though, and some of the entries are more than a little dubious. Not for the casual reader.
[177]Kunkel. G. Plants for Human Consumption.
An excellent book for the dedicated. A comprehensive listing of latin names with a brief list of edible parts.
[218]Duke. J. A. and Ayensu. E. S. Medicinal Plants of China
Details of over 1,200 medicinal plants of China and brief details of their uses. Often includes an analysis, or at least a list of constituents. Heavy going if you are not into the subject.
[272]Manandhar. N. P. Plants and People of Nepal
Excellent book, covering over 1,500 species of useful plants from Nepal together with information on the geography and peoples of Nepal. Good descriptions of the plants with terse notes on their uses.
[279] Medicinal Plants in the Republic of Korea
An excellent book with terse details about the medicinal uses of the plants with references to scientific trials. All plants are described, illustrated and brief details of habitats given.

**** www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19533579

Planta Med. 2009 Nov;75(14):1505-8. Epub 2009 Jun 16.
Torilin from Torilis japonica inhibits melanin production in alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone-activated B16 melanoma cells.
Yun CY, Kim D, Lee WH, Park YM, Lee SH, Na M, Jahng Y, Hwang BY, Lee MK, Han SB, Kim Y.
Source
College of Pharmacy & Research Center for Bioresource and Health, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju, Korea.
Abstract
Epidermal melanocytes synthesize melanin pigments and transfer them to keratinocytes, which is responsible for skin pigmentation. However, abnormal accumulation of melanin pigments causes hyperpigmentation disorders, which are substantially improved with treatment of tyrosinase inhibitor. In our ongoing study, Torilis japonica DC. (Umbelliferae) was found to inhibit melanin production. A goal of this study is to elucidate the hypopigmenting principle of T. japonica. A sesquiterpene structure of torilin was isolated from the plant extracts via bioassay-guided phytochemical analysis. Torilin dose-dependently inhibited melanin production, with an IC(50) value of 25 microM, in alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH)-activated B16 melanoma cells. Arbutin, a positive control of skin whitener, also inhibited alpha-MSH-induced melanin production with an IC(50) value of 170 microM. As to the mode of action, torilin downregulated alpha-MSH-induced protein levels of tyrosinase without directly inhibiting catalytic activity of the enzyme. Taken together, this study shows that torilin contributes to the hypopigmenting principle of T. japonica, and suggests its pharmacological potential in melanin-associated hyperpigmentation disorders.
Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart, New York.
PMID: 19533579 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

**** www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=3&taxon_id=2…
Torilis japonica (Houtt.) DC.
小窃衣
Description from Flora of China
Caucalis japonica Houttuyn, Nat. Hist. 2(8): 42. 1777; Anthriscus vulgaris Bernhardi; C. anthriscus (Linnaeus) Hudson; C. coniifolia Wallich ex de Candolle; C. elata D. Don; C. praetermissa (Hance) Franchet; Tordylium anthriscus Linnaeus; Torilis anthriscus (Linnaeus) C. C. Gmelin (1805), not (Linnaeus) Gaertner (1788); T. anthriscus var. japonica (Houttuyn) H. de Boissieu; T. praetermissa Hance.
Chaerophyllum scabrum Thunberg in Murray, Syst. Veg., ed. 14, 289. 1784; Anthriscus scabra (Thunberg) Koso-Poljansky; Caucalis scabra (Thunberg) Makino; Torilis henryi C. Norman.
Herbs 20–120 cm tall. Basal and lower cauline leaves petiolate; petiole 2–7 cm; blade triangular-ovate to ovate-lanceolate in outline, up to 20 × 17 cm; pinnae ovate-lanceolate, 2–6 × 1–2.5 cm. Peduncles 3–25 cm, retrorse hispid; bracts few, linear; rays 4–12, 1–3 cm spreading, bristly; bracteoles 5–8, linear or subulate, 1.5–7 × 0.5–1.5 mm; umbellules 4–12-flowered. Pedicels 1–4 mm, shorter than bracteoles. Calyx teeth small, deltoid-lanceolate. Fruit often blackish purple when mature, globose-ovoid, 1.5–5 × 1–2.5 mm. Fl. and fr. Apr–Oct.
The roots and fruits are used medicinally in some provinces.
Mixed forests in valleys, grassy places, especially in disturbed areas; 100–3800 m. Throughout China, except Heilongjiang, Nei Mongol, and Xinjiang [widespread as a ruderal in Asia and Europe].

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‘En famille’

This little dog and her family were at the recent ‘Naval Battle of the Flowers’ festival in Villefrranche-Sur-Mer. 

RIVIERA DOGS

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Side Effects of Rimadyl in Dogs

In the past you may have seen television commercials showing previously lame dogs jumping and running about like young puppies. These commercials were promoting Rimadyl, a drug introduced in 1997 by Pfizer Chemical for the treatment of hip dysplasia and arthritis in dogs. What the commercials carefully avoided was any mention of the side effects of Rimadyl in dogs.

Today it’s no longer possible to see those commercials because the advertising was halted by Pfizer for good reasons. As a dog owner, we are indebted to dogs like Montana, a six-year-old Siberian husky who had stiff legs. Montana was prescribed Rimadyl by his veterinarian and at first the drug appeared to work well. But then Montana lost his appetite, wobbled when he walked, and finally was unable to walk at all. He began vomiting and had seizures; eventually his owner was forced to put him to sleep. An autopsy was performed which showed the presence of liver damage that could only be associated with a harmful drug reaction.

Drugs for pets are big business in the United States, as well as in many other countries where pet animals are valued. It is estimated that world-wide, the sale of these drugs total more than 3-1/2 Billion dollars annually. Rimadyl is one of the bestselling drugs included in this estimate.

Rimadyl has been prescribed for more than four million dogs in the United States alone, and has earned Pfizer tens of millions of dollars. After introducing the drug, the company ran full-page magazine ads and a public-relations campaign that resulted in 1,785 print stories, 856 radio reports and more than 200 television news reports of the benefits of Rimadyl. What dog owner whose beloved pet was suffering from arthritis or hip dysplasia wouldn’t want such a “miracle drug” for their pet?

But Rimadyl has also resulted in many debates and intense arguments between veterinarians and pet owners who were furious that they were not warned of the risks of giving their pets Rimadyl.

After Montana’s owner contacted Pfizer and the Food and Drug Administration to complain about the early and untimely death of her dog, Pfizer offered to pay her $ 440 in what they called “a gesture of good will.” Today we can be thankful that Montana’s owner was insulted by Pfizer’s offer and their lawyers’ stipulation that she tell no one about the payment (or bribe as some would call it). She refused to sign any of Pfizer’s proffered documents and would not accept any money. She felt it was an affront both to her and to the memory of Montana to absolve Pfizer of any blame.

As additional reports of serious reactions and the deaths of many dogs started pouring into the FDA, the agency recommended that Pfizer list “death” as a possible side effect in a warning letter to veterinarians and also place a warning on the drug labels. Pfizer indicated this “would be devastating to the product” and after much stalling, eventually was forced to put the word “death” on Rimadyl’s labels and notify all veterinarians in writing.

The strongest blow to Pfizer’s inappropriate labeling and advertising was the FDA’s requirement that they mention the same warning on their television ads. When given an ultimatum about their commercials mentioning “death” or else pulling the ads, Pfizer chose to stop all television ads for Rimadyl. Although this came too late to save the life of Montana, he and his owner should be credited with bringing pressure to bear on the FDA and Pfizer and forcing them to begin warning of the possible serious side effects of Rimadyl.

Since the introduction of Rimadyl in 1997, the FDA has received reports of more than 1,000 dogs that died or had to be put to sleep, and 7,000 more that had serious adverse reactions after taking the drug.

Despite these serious side effects, the FDA has not ordered the removal of Rimadyl from the marketplace. The FDA requires safety and efficacy testing for animal drugs just as it does for human drugs. However, animal drug tests are conducted with a much smaller number of test subjects. Pfizer used about 500 dogs in their trials of Rimadyl, which is less than one fifth the number of subjects used in most human-drug trials. During Pfizer’s Rimadyl trials, some dogs developed unusual liver-function readings and one young beagle tested on a high dose of the drug died.

Neither the FDA or Pfizer found these effects alarming, and the drug was subsequently approved. A consumer group has mounted a campaign against Pfizer called BARKS, which stands for ”Be Aware of Rimadyl’s Known Side-effects.” Hopefully this organization will be able to influence more dog owners to carefully consider very seriously whether or not to have Rimadyl prescribed for their pet dog.

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Controversy at 2014 Crufts Show

What do you do if your show dog has flyaway hair? At most dog shows, you would simply use hair spray to keep the fur in place during the show. However, outdated Crufts rules outlaw the use of any artificial enhancers such as hairspray or the chalk some handlers use to make white dogs appear […]


Doggies.com Dog Blog

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A Labrador in Heaven

A few nice skin allergies images I found:

A Labrador in Heaven
skin allergies

Image by pmarkham
We had several inches of rain out at the farm last weekend — enough that it turned about 1/3 of the pasture into a temporary lake. The dogs thought this was *FABULOUS* and immediately decided it was time to go swimming and playing in the water.

Holly especially loves to play in the water any chance she gets.

Holly was originally supposed to be a Helping Paws service dog. My wife and I trained her from the time she was 8 weeks old. A year into her training she developed skin allergy problems. Between that, and her quirky personality, it was decided she wasn’t a good fit to be a service dog. She now lives with my friend Steve (the guy who owns the farm I always talk about).

A Labrador in Heaven
skin allergies

Image by pmarkham
We had several inches of rain out at the farm last weekend — enough that it turned about 1/3 of the pasture into a temporary lake. The dogs thought this was *FABULOUS* and immediately decided it was time to go swimming and playing in the water.

Holly especially loves to play in the water any chance she gets.

Holly was originally supposed to be a Helping Paws service dog. My wife and I trained her from the time she was 8 weeks old. A year into her training she developed skin allergy problems. Between that, and her quirky personality, it was decided she wasn’t a good fit to be a service dog. She now lives with my friend Steve (the guy who owns the farm I always talk about).

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Hank: Star of the Cactus League

If you follow pre-season baseball, you may have already heard about Hank, who is overshadowing this year’s players at the Milwaukee Brewer’s training camp. No, not the Hank Aaron who started his career in Milwaukee. This Hank is a stray dog who wandered into the team’s complex back in February looking a little worse for […]


Doggies.com Dog Blog

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Meet Malcolm and Murphy

2 Dogs 2,000 Miles

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Counter-Conditioning and Desensitization for Dogs (Part 3)

Basic Graduation 2-14-12

Last week I described the counter-condition and desensitization process (CC&DS). When is it the right approach, as opposed to addressing a problem with reward-based training?

Deciding that an association is causing your dog to behave a certain way means making assumptions about what is going on "inside" the dog. These kinds of assumptions are not always right. As a matter of fact, these kinds of assumptions are what can lead to describing a dog as stubborn, dumb, or even the dreaded (and horribly misused) "dominant." Which is not a personality attribute dammit. But I digress…

With the understanding that we are making judgements based on our dog’s body language and behavior there is a general rule we can follow. We use CC&DS to change an undesirable response to a stimulus that seems to be driven by a negative reaction to the stimulus. Let’s consider three possible responses to a human stranger approaching a dog:

  1. The dog attempts to escape.
  2. The dog lunges, growls, barks, in what we would characterize as an aggressive manner.
  3. The dog attempts to jump up and greet the person.

In numbers one and two the dog’s reaction is negative. Both reactions are likely driven by fear. In number three his reaction is positive – he is happy to see the person and wants to greet them, albeit in an inappropriate manner.

We need to change the emotional response in scenarios one and two. A dog that is attempting to flee or attack cannot be taught to greet someone politely, and even if it were possible, he would probably still be distressed. We want to make him more comfortable. This is job for CC&DS.

In scenario three the dog is happy to see people! We certainly don’t want to change that. We have a training problem: we need to teach him how to greet people politely.

In situations where we need to make something "bad" become something "good" (or at least a lot less bad) we use CC&DS. In a situation where something is already good but the response is what is "bad" we use training.

That’s it for CC&DS in this series. Next week we move on to a new chapter in the ABC’s.

But before we move on, here’s a cute video illustrating how classical conditioning works. I wish I had found it when I started this series.

Counter-Conditioning and Desensitization for Dogs (Part 3) is a post written by . You can see the actual post at Dog Training in Bergen County New Jersey


Dog Spelled Forward Website and Blog

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Q&A: Guinea Pigs and Mites?

Question by Nibbles Biscuit: Guinea Pigs and Mites?
What is Mites and how do I Prevent it? is it contagious?

Best answer:

Answer by Luv-A-Bee <3
they’re called mange mites and no they aren’t contageous, but if you own other guinea pig’s it can be passed from one to the other. They are like fleas. To prevent them you should house your guinea pig’s inside (as wood cages are where they live) . Also if you bathe your guinea pig with special guinea pig shampoo that can prevent it. To get rid of them you have to take your guinea pig(s) to the vet to get a special drug used on them.

Add your own answer in the comments!

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We love you to death

Veterinary medicine, the happiest field on earth, land of puppy butts and kitty snuggles and Pet Doctor Barbies in hotpants, or so they told me when I was 10.

Or perhaps it is the land of crushing student debt, clients frustrated that they are priced out of affordable care, and the unending mental strain of not being able to make every client happy and whole at the price they want you to provide it for.

Maybe it’s somewhere in between, but to be honest it seems to me like it’s leaning a little more towards the latter than the former. It wasn’t always this way, and yes, there are plenty of vets who still tell you they couldn’t imagine doing anything else, but for many, they can. And do. I was shocked to see how many of my colleagues- good, smart, compassionate veterinarians- have left the field. It happens a LOT.

kittysnuggles

Kitty snuggles may not solve all the world’s ills, but it does help a whole lot.

Burnout rates are high, depression is rampant, and though the world was shocked to learn veterinarians have the highest suicide rates of medical professionals, no actual vets seemed too shocked by the news. The truth is, this is a tough, tough field, and the toll it takes is financial, physical, and mental, each and every day. We are expected by society and each other to buck up and put your own needs on the backburner, day after day after day, and it. wears. you. down.Justine Lee has a great article on the topic: one in four vets have considered suicide.

Last week, a colleague followed through, and our field is all the less for her loss.

It might surprise you to know that while our field tiptoes around the concept of compassion fatigue, it’s not regularly acknowledged as an almost inevitable part of what we do. Those who feel the strain are often left to feel guilty and disappointed in themselves for feeling that way. When the timing is wrong, when the wrong case hits at the same time as a broken water main or someone delivering a court summons, it can be very easy to forget that there is a way through that mess.

Animal lovers are deeply sensitive by nature, and I think both animal care providers and clients may be prone to those intensities of emotion that can veer into unhealthy places. I’ve dedicated my work the last year or so to acknowledging we need to do a better job supporting the emotional needs of our clients, but the truth is we need to so the same for our own.

I sincerely hope our field is able to provide better support for our own in terms of learning to cope with the unique stressors of this career, that those support groups that exist within the veterinary community are not kind of shoved in the corner to be sought out in desperation but held up as a standard for healthy venting and encouraging each other to live well and live outside the clinic.

I bring this up for several reasons, namely because I was very saddened by Dr. Koshi’s death and the circumstances surrounding it. I want my colleagues, especially those of you who are young and still learning how to do this vet thing and do it well, to understand that we all know how hard it can be. The internet has not made this easier. We need to be able to rely on each other and on the profession as a whole.

If any of you are struggling, please reach out, to your friends, to a hotline, to me, I don’t care who you reach out to but just stick your hand out and wave and we will take it. I am happy to hear multiple veterinarians including Dr. Lee, Dr. Myers, and others at NAVC met up to discuss what we can do to be more organized in our support of each other and stop being ashamed of admitting sometimes, this field is HARD.

And for you non-vets, because I know many of you are amazing clients, I want to thank you for being the kind of people who make going to work worthwhile. You are the reason we continue to pull our lab coats on every day.

RIP Dr. Koshi, and know that we will acknowledge and remember the wonderful work you did in this world.

Pawcurious: With Pet Lifestyle Expert and Veterinarian Dr. V.

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