I SO wish that I lived closer that I could thank a…

I SO wish that I lived closer that I could thank all these volunteers, meet some wonderful dogs and get involved!

I hope it's a terrific event and well attended – good luck.
BAD RAP Blog

Posted in Pet Care Articles | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

The One Thing I’m Telling You Before You Have a Kid

There are few situations I dread more than a young couple with a new pet they refer to as “our child”. I’m not talking every young couple with a pet, mind you, but specifically those that refer to him or her as a kid. Though you might expect these to be the most involved and conscientious owners, and oftentimes they are, just as often you see them about a year or two later with a stroller and a decidedly changed attitude. And then you don’t see them at all.

Note to Allison: You Personally Shouldn’t Get a Dog. Don’t Speak for Me.

Case in point: Allison Benedikt, the author of the recent Slate piece “The One Thing No One Tells You Before You Have Kids: Don’t Get a Dog“, her  story of dog ownership gone awry that unsurprisingly begins with her boyfriend surprising her with a border collie/American Eskimo mix she hadn’t asked for. And it went OK, until she got pregnant and suddenly realized her dog was not a child, it was a dog, and she didn’t really want one after all.

I have no problem with people who refer to their pets as children/furkids/what have you, as long as they do so with the understanding that their pet is, in fact, not a human child surrogate but an actual animal. Loving your pet like a kid: fine. Expecting your pet to act in proxy for a human until an actual human comes along, then resenting them for not being a human: not ok. And therein lies the difference.

The problem I have with pieces like Allison’s is that it dismisses her pet with a shrug and an “oh well, this is what happens when you have kids, amiritelol?” And the answer to that is, it doesn’t have to.

kids

The Truth About Dog Ownership After Kids

When you bring a new baby home, the dog slips down a notch and experiences neglect the likes of which you promised wouldn’t happen but happens anyway. This neglect applies equally well to your spouse, yourself, other children in the house, your career, everything. This is not a unique phenomenon. But guess what? Your dog forgives you.

Your dog is not a human. I repeat, your dog is NOT A HUMAN. This means several things:

1. Yes, Allison, they will continue to do things like shed and lick themselves and all the other things they did before. On the plus side, no diapers.

2. If you pressured yourself to participate in doggy weekly playgroups and aromatherapy sessions and are feeling guilty that you no longer want to do that, that’s on you. Your dog doesn’t care. Because he’s a dog and doesn’t get guilt. Give him a brushing (see 1) and a bone and you’re all good.

Parenthood Isn’t The End of the World for you Or your Pet

Seriously. People have been doing it for thousands of years; yes, things change afterwards, but you deal and get through it. If you have an epiphany afterwards that what you really wanted was a human, not a dog/cat/whatever, that’s on you, not the pet.

If you truly are in a situation where it can’t work; severe allergies or safety issues or the like, do the right thing and find a good home yourself instead of placing the burden on a shelter (in which case it might be the end of the world for your pet).

If there is one thing I could tell anyone before they have kids, it’s actually very simple: Don’t get a dog unless you want a dog. Because surprisingly enough, they’re going to stay one long past the time you bring home baby.

Pawcurious: With Pet Lifestyle Expert and Veterinarian Dr. V.

Posted in Pet Care Articles | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Skin Allergies in Dogs: Types, Causes and Symptoms

http://www.dermagic.com – This video describes various types of skin allergies in dogs, and describes their symptoms and causes. It will also teach you how t…
Video Rating: 4 / 5

Posted in Pet Care Media | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

Bold Raccoon Bogarts Cats’ Food, Grabs A Few Roadies [VIDEO]

Watch as this bold raccoon casually strolls up to a group of hungry cats, bogarts their food and then executes a hilarious 'grab and go' of more tayshtee schnax at the end.

Be sure to wait until the end to see his amazing exit from the scene of the crime!

Raccoon Bogarts Cat Food

source: Huffington Post

 -Janet McCulley



The Daily Treat: Animal Planet

Posted in Pet Care Articles | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Why Dogs Puke

Dogs puke just like humans do if they’re overcome with nausea and acute indigestion.

If your dog swallows a solid object, it often vomits it back up. If the object is small enough it may pass through the dog’s intestinal system and be released in its feces. If the object is too large or it has sharp edges, you should plan on an emergency visit to the vet for x-rays.

If your dog has eaten leaves or berries from a bush you’re unfamiliar with, it’s important you know whether the plant is poisonous or not. The easiest way to check for poisonous plants is to call the ASPCA at (888) 426-4435.

If a dog eats table scraps that are high in fat content it can easily end up having intestinal distress. A dog’s digestive system was not designed to digest rich, fatty foods like humans eat. These types of food are often not healthy for us, let alone for our dogs. If your dog begins vomiting soon after scarfing down something from your table, it’s a clear indication that you need to avoid giving it any type of food you normally eat.

A dog may also puke because it’s allergic to certain foods. If you recently started your dog on a new diet and the vomiting began shortly thereafter, you might try mixing half of its old food with half of the new food and watch closely for changes in behavior or lingering illness. It’s possible that an intolerance or aversion to ingredients in the new food may be causing the vomiting. If you suspect this may be the cause, you can continue changing the ratio of old food to the new food to see if the vomiting goes away.

If your dog sometimes pukes due to any of the following, it will require a visit to the vet for diagnosis and treatment:
(1) Infection with parasites, viruses or bacteria can cause gastrointestinal infections also known as viral gastroenteritis. Diarrhea and vomiting are the most obvious symptoms. Many different types of bacteria and parasites can also cause GI infections and diarrhea but most of these are not serious and will go away on their own after a few days; however, others can be serious.

(2) Ulcers can be caused by anti-inflammatory medications prescribed for skin conditions, arthritis, or other chronic health problems. Pain relief medications such as aspirin and ibuprofen inhibit a hormone-like substance that acts as a protection for a dog’s stomach lining. Prolonged use of these medications can cause severe stomach ulcers in dogs. Another less common cause of canine stomach ulcers is a mast cell cancer in the dog’s skin. Mast cell cancers release histamine which leads to stomach ulcers.

(3) Kidney Failure early signs are increased water consumption and increased urine output. Signs of more advanced kidney failure include loss of appetite, depression, vomiting and diarrhea.

(4) Cancers signs that warrant a visit to your veterinarian include any new lump or bump; a change in size, shape, or consistency of an existing lump; a runny nose, especially if bloody; difficulty urinating or bloody urine; limping or a change in gait; foul breath and lethargy.

(5) Inflammatory bowel disease causes are unknown. Genetics, nutrition, infectious agents, and abnormalities of the immune system may all play a role. The most common signs of inflammatory bowel disease in dogs are vomiting, diarrhea, and weight loss. Vomiting is more common when the stomach or upper portion of the small intestine are affected and diarrhea is more common when the colon is involved. There is an increase in the frequency of defecation, but less stool is produced each time. There is often increased mucous or some blood in the stool. Sometimes stools become loose. Many times the diarrhea and vomiting may be irregular.

(6) Liver disease early signs include chronic intermittent vomiting and diarrhea. Vomiting is more common than diarrhea, loss of appetite, or weight loss. Drinking and urinating more often than normal may be the first signs, and a key reason for visiting the vet.

If your dog pukes repeatedly and the cause is not readily apparent, you should schedule an exam with your vet. Your pet’s health and life may depend upon it.

Share and Enjoy:

Digg
del.icio.us
Facebook
Reddit
StumbleUpon
Twitter
Technorati
MySpace
FriendFeed
Google Bookmarks




Posted in Pet Care Articles | Tagged , | Leave a comment

‘Traveling Light’ Contest for a Free Copy

The publisher of ‘Traveling Light’ is offering a contest for a free copy of Andrea Thalasinos’s new book!  The book was published recently and Andrea Thalasinos is currently on her book tour.  If you want to enter the contest for a free copy, just leave a comment to this post!  The contest will be open until Thursday, August 8.  The winner will be chosen Friday.

You can find more information about the book here!


PetsitUSA Blog

Posted in Pet Care Articles | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Skin allergies [Bimbo Talks] Ep 2

Subscribe! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=alozerk Facebook! http://www.facebook.com/Nightowlcinematics Part 1 here : http://www.youtube….

Posted in Pet Care Media | Tagged , , , | 25 Comments

In Plain View (Valley Of Choice – Book Two) by Olvia Newport ~ Book Review

Title: In Plain View (Valley of Choice Series – Book Two)

Publish Date: June 1, 2013


 You can follow Olivia Newport on: 

 And you can follow Barbour Publishing on:

Description

After leaving her outwardly successful but unsatisfying life for Amish simplicity, Annie Friesen continues to dismantle her technology-dependent world. Despite her best intentions and her love for Rufus Beiler, one challenge after another falls across her path. In counterpart, Ruth, an Amish woman, wrestles with her reasons for leaving the community despite the pain it causes the people who love her. When the Amish and the English work together on a community project, an explosion hurls doubt in every direction. Determined to find proof of what happened, Annie learns lessons in trust, humility, and letting go.

My thoughts

I have some mixed thoughts about this book. I loved every part of the book that was about Rufus and Annie but the parts that were about the ancestors from way back was a bit confusing to keep track of some times. It was interesting because I feel that it is all going to come together in the end but with some of the names being handed down it did get a bit confusing and hard to keep track of especially when it jumped forward in years.
Annie was trying so hard to become the Amish person that she wanted to become and her parents seem to be trying so hard to fight that all the while just the opposite seemed to be happening to Ruth. She still wanted the plain life but wanted to get her college education while Annie just wanted to leave her English life behind and start living a plain life with Rufus. And she wanted that plain life whether she lived it with Rufus or not and she needed for her parents to learn to believe that.
All of Rufus’s family has welcomed Annie into their family with open arms, now if she could just get Rufus to see how much she really loved him or would he really be better with a pure Amish woman? Is Annie better to stay and get and start the baptism classes or return to the English life that she once new? So much is going through Annie’s mind and she is always wondering if Rufus is in love with her or not.
Even though I don’t give this book 4 or 5 stars, I am definitely looking forward to reading the next book in this series called, Taken For English.
 
You can read my review of Accidentally Amish (Valley of Choice – Book One) HERE.

Images and Exerpt are from NetGalley and the video is from YouTube, compliments of Barbour Publishing.com.
I was not paid for this review, I did however receive a copy of the book for my Kindle from NetGalley. The opinions of this book are mine and mine alone.

 siggy


LoveMy2Dogs

Posted in Pet Care Articles | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Mood

I had to go to the car to grab something… she thought we were leaving.  This is her “What? But we just got here look.”

Life has settled down dramatically these past few weeks… at least for now.  But I’m still not really in a mood to take photos or rather to edit or do anything with them.  I’ve still been taking my camera most days and taking at least some photos but they are mainly just sitting on my computer doing nothing.

I got a Waboba and I like it.

I have a client order that needs to be fulfilled and I keep putting it off – claiming (to myself) that I haven’t had the time.  And that isn’t true.  I have had the time, but I just haven’t been in the right mood, at the right time. Hopefully I’ll snap out of it this weekend as I’ll need to do the order as well as edit some more agility pictures from Regionals.

They are supposed be used on land but it bounced pretty good so we just went with it.

So while I was going to do a casual review of the Waboba fetch ball, I’m going to leave that for another day.

And I wondered why she stunk to high heaven after this walk.

Coulee enjoyed it.  What more do you need to know?

Riding home with her new toy.

Crazy Coulee and Little Lacey

Posted in Pet Care Articles | Tagged | Leave a comment

Bayer HealthCare | Advantage® II Topical vs. Pill Video

www.bayerus.com – Watch this video to learn about the difference between topical solutions and oral flea products. Bayer Corporation, headquartered in Pittsb…

How to apply topical flea medication to pet.
Video Rating: 0 / 5

Posted in Pet Care Media | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment