FDA investigating a second Diamond Pet Foods plant due to salmonella

Diamond Pet Food recallThe Diamond Pet Foods recall just seems to get uglier and uglier by the day. The recall, first announced in April, has grown to include a number of dog and cat foods manufactured at their Gaston, South Carolina plant. However, the most recent addition to the recall was for some of their Diamond Naturals Small Breed Adult Dog Lamb & Rice Formula manufactured in their Meta, Missouri plant. Now the FDA is investigating that plant as well. (Diamond has another plant in California. There’s no word yet of recalls of food coming of that plant.)

All of the food recalled has been due to Salmonella. But, according to the FDA, there are two different strains of Salmonella involved. Laura Alvey, of the FDA, spoke with Food Safety News:

U.S. Food and Drug Administration spokeswoman Laura Alvey has told Food Safety News that the Salmonella contamination found at Diamond’s Meta, Missouri plant is not from the same strain as that of the Gaston, South Carolina plant. The contamination at the Missouri plant comes from Salmonella Liverpool, while the South Carolina plant — connected to all products except those in the most recent recall expansion — has been contaminated by Salmonella Infantis.

Alvey also said that the Missouri plant has now been included in the FDA’s ongoing investigation into the Diamond Pet Foods Salmonella outbreak and recall.

[...]

U.S. Food and Drug Administration spokeswoman Laura Alvey has told Food Safety News that the Salmonella contamination found at Diamond’s Meta, Missouri plant is not from the same strain as that of the Gaston, South Carolina plant. The contamination at the Missouri plant comes from Salmonella Liverpool, while the South Carolina plant — connected to all products except those in the most recent recall expansion — has been contaminated by Salmonella Infantis.

Alvey also said that the Missouri plant has now been included in the FDA’s ongoing investigation into the Diamond Pet Foods Salmonella outbreak and recall.

Read the rest here here.

If you’re still feeding anything manufactured by Diamond, please find another food. What’s more important? Brand loyalty or loyalty to your pet?


PetsitUSA Blog

Posted in Pet Care Articles | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Menu Foods Reaches Settlement Agreement

Menu Foods

Here is a press release dated April 1 on Menu Foods website:

Menu Foods Income Fund (TSX: MEW.UN) announced that the parties to the Pet Food Multi-District Litigation (including Menu Foods) today advised the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey that their mediation has produced a comprehensive, cross-border agreement in principle between the parties, addressing all major terms of settlement.

The settlement in principle is subject to several conditions, including the approval of certain other parties, the execution of a definitive settlement agreement and review and approval of the U.S. District Court and the Canadian courts. The parties advised the court that they are confident that a definitive settlement agreement can be reached.

The definitive terms of settlement, together with a motion for preliminary approval thereof, are scheduled to be filed with the U.S. District Court on May 1, 2008, with the hearing scheduled to occur at 11:00 a.m. on May 14, 2008. The scheduling for Canadian court approval has not yet been determined, but is expected to occur in a similar time frame.

Continue reading

Posted in Pet Care Articles | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

A0000P0004

Some cool Flea Topical images:

A0000P0004
Flea Topical

Image by Nottingham Vet School
A bottle of Frontline spray.

Gracie Desperately Needs a Home!
Flea Topical

Image by DDFic
Gracie–easily the most affectionate and companionable cat we have ever met–has been close to adoption so many times I’ve nearly lost count, every family has backed out for reasons entirely unrelated to Gracie herself.

Gracie’s life has been one long streak of bad luck. She was born stray, taken in by the Humane Society, returned due to family misfortune, then adopted again. I knew her second family, and they were devastated when they had to give her up. My sister was kind enough to take her in back when Gracie was one of only two cats in the house. She did so well for so long, as did Gale, but then Gale lost perspective on the number of pets she could reasonably care for, and Gracie began being neglected. It was only just starting to improve when Gale died.

Despite all this, Gracie has done well and kept a good attitude. Even now, she is incredibly friendly and rebounds from most anything. She’s not very vocal, unless you count purring. She loves being petted and groomed. If we didn’t already have six cats of our own, we’d take her in a split second. We almost did anyhow, but someone else begged for her within days of us posting the initial plea for homes. We chose instead to take a very sick cat that needed immediate and constant medical treatment. We don’t regret that choice, but it breaks our hearts every time Gracie misses out on a home. And it just keeps happening…

We so desperately want lovely Gracie to land on her paws that we’ve taken her to our vet to get all her shots updated. Gracie is in VERY GOOD health despite spotty veterinary care for the last decade. Yes, she’s no longer a kitten, but don’t let her 12 years deter you. We’ve personally cared for very ill cats that lived great lives until 18-19 years. Gracie isn’t sick at all, and she has endured conditions that left other cats at that farm in bad health. She’s tough, so imagine how long she’s got ahead of her when in an attentive home! She is confirmed clear of any transmissible cat diseases, had no worms at her last vet check, has been spayed, and she’s even microchipped. I will provide you with a copy of our vet paperwork.

There are two things you should be aware of regarding Gracie, though:

1: She is allergic to fleas, and her coat suffered the consequences because my sister ignored the problem. When in full fluff, she is spectacular. Even now, she’s gorgeous, and the patches in her coat are starting to re-grow. You may want to get her professionally groomed to get her off to a good start. Our vet indicated she should be in a home with indoor-only pets. He also recommended monthly, topical flea treatment as a precaution. It needs to address the full life cycle of a flea: egg, larvae and adult. He recommended Advantage. We will send her to you with a starter supply.

2: She’s lost all but one of her teeth due to poor dental care. While that may freak you out a bit, it’s a non-issue to her. Her weight is fine. She’s in no pain, gums look healthy, she has no mouth odor, and – like many cats – just gulps her kibble without trying to chew, though you could certainly feed her wet food if you prefer. She does love it :)

Gracie has her front claws. She is used to living in a high energy household with with a small dog, and, obviously, lots of cats (in other words, she can hold her own). However, she also adores attention and would not mind being your only cat provided you don’t mind a cat that wants to spend lots of time with you! She’s great with kids and is very much a "people cat."

For info, please leave a comment here or mail me at lawsontl at woh dot rr dot com. I need your EMAIL address and a working PHONE NUMBER if you are interested. I have had too many people do "drive-by" inquiries that got my hopes up and wasted her time as well as mine.

I will ask the adopter to sign a simple contract before finalizing just to ensure she gets the same or better home than what she has now. When I get your email, I will send the contract to you immediately so you can review before committing to anything! Thank you so much for your consideration.

Posted in Pet Care Media | Tagged | Leave a comment

Cushing’s Disease, Canine Diabetes and Hypothyroidism in Dogs

By D. Thurmond, D.V.M. Dogs suffer from hormonal imbalances just as their owners do on occasion. Canine diabetes, hypothyroidism in dogs and Cushing’s disease are three of the most common endocrine diseases for canines. Cushing’s Disease Cushing’s may be naturally occurring or the result of corticosteroid use. It is the result of an overactive adrenal [...]
Dog Food Blog

Posted in Pet Care Articles | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Dog Training Tips – Learning to play frisbee, or Disc Dog, with Maxx the border collie

This video covers the basics of dog training tips to teaching your dog how to play frisbee, or disc dog, with you. Maxx, a 12-year-old rescued border collie learns to catch a disc for the first time….



[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]




Dog Training Blog | Tips and Dog Training Resources

Posted in Pet Care Articles | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Good info! Thanks for sharing with us on your blog…

Good info! Thanks for sharing with us on your blog.
BAD RAP Blog

Posted in Pet Care Articles | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Q&A: Flea prevention!?

Question by boggs: Flea prevention!?
We have 2 indoor cats and we are getting a dog. If we use Frontline on both the dog and cats will we be safe from a flea infestation?

Best answer:

Answer by Lisa T
yes, Just be certain you get the Frontline for dogs,( for the dog as I’m sure you know). Cats and dogs taken different “doses”

What do you think? Answer below!

Posted in Pet Care Media | Tagged , | 7 Comments

Happy In His Cone

Sprinkle Happiness:

Chuppy is modeling a cone because he has a booboo. Chup Chup doesn’t mind a bit…I mean look at that big, goofy smile!

A Place to Love Dogs

Posted in Pet Care Articles | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Help Maddie’s Fund empty Bay Area animal shelters

On June 9 & 10 Maddie’s Fund is holding their third annual Maddie’s® Matchmaker Adoptathon. The goal is to empty the animal shelters in their local counties of San Francisco, Alameda, and Contra Costa by providing absolutely FREE adoptions for all dogs and cats at more than 80 participating locations. Their 2010 event resulted in 1,809 adoptions, and 2,312 pets were adopted in 2011. This year’s goal is to find loving, forever homes for 3,000 cats and dogs.

In addition to offering free adoptions, Maddie’s Fund is also donating between $ 500 to $ 2000 to the participating organizations for every adoption they do that weekend — $ 500 for healthy young pets, $ 1000 for older pets or those with specific health issues, and $ 2000 for every cat or dog who is both a senior and has a health problem. They expect to spend around $ 3 million on this effort.

If you’ve read my blog much, you know how much I love my two dogs. Both them are rescues. Archie was in a very bad situation when a coworker rescued him, and I adopted Lydia from Town Lake Animal Center in Austin. I can’t imagine life without either of them, and when I consider that Lydia would have likely been euthanized had I not adopted her, it sends chills up my spine. She and Archie have always been very sweet, loving dogs and I’m so fortunate to have them in my life. And the fact is, shelters are full of dogs like them just waiting for someone to come along, give them a chance, and live happily ever after.

So, if you’re in the Bay Area and are thinking of adopting a cat or dog, this weekend is a great time to do it! Even if you’re not in the Bay Area though, if you’re thinking of adopting, why not visit your local shelter this weekend? Your best friend may very well be waiting for you right now.

For a complete list of participating shelters, and more information, see the Maddie’s Fund Adoptathon website.


PetsitUSA Blog

Posted in Pet Care Articles | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

How Long Should Bathing a Dog Take?

I'm a bather at a grooming salon. It seems like no matter what I try I can't bathe the dogs quickly enough. The groomers always get impatient with me, and it's started negatively impacting my relationship with them. I'm fairly new at this sort of thing, but when I ask them for tips about how to improve, they don't say much. It's getting to the point where I'm starting to look for a new job, because it seems I'll never be good enough at this one. It's very frustrating, because you would think this sort of thing wouldn't be that hard to get down.

Some questions I'd love to have straight answers for so I have something to work on would be these:

How long should bathing dogs take? I know it varies, but having a time estimate for a few of the main breeds (shih tzus, standard poodles, Yorkies, golden retrievers) would really help.

Any tips for bathing dogs quickly, while still actually getting them clean? I've noticed a lot of groomers cut corners, leaving grease in the dogs' hair or soap in their ears, or neglecting to brush their teeth. I really don't want to do that. I want to get the dogs clean, but I need to be faster.

Thanks so much.

Suggestion:

I don't have an estimate for you by breed. I have a relatively short-haired (2-3" hair) 40 pound dog and my mom has long-coated dogs, whose coat hits the floor in some cases, ranging from 40-70 pounds. She has a pro grooming set-up as she shows her dogs.

I can bathe and condition any one of those dogs in 20 minutes and get them thoroughly cleaned and rinsed. If I skipped the conditioner, it would be 10-12 mintues a dog.

ETA: I'm not a professional groomer or bather, I've just been helping my mom out for years so have gotten a routine down and now I am a lot faster than she is.

You have to get the dog completely wet to the skin, both to get him completely clean and to make everything else (like lathering him up) go quicker. It helps if you have a plan instead of going haphazardly with the sprayer. I gently lift the dog's nose up from below with one hand and then start getting his neck wet (keeps him from leaning his head down and getting water in his ears,eyes, etc.) Then I work back in sections, from top to bottom. Especially if the dog has really thick hair/dense undercoat, it's quicker to get him totally wet to the skin using the sprayer againt the pattern of hairgrowth. Keep the sprayer really close to the body when wetting or rinsing–makes things a lot quicker. You're not going to hurt him with the sprayer!

I put the shampoo in my hands, rub them together and apply to the dog. I work a section at a time, again working front to back, top to bottom. If it's a long-haired breed, you have to make sure you get all the way to the ends of the feathering.

Same routine as wetting him to rinse him, though takes longer to be sure all the soap is out. And you want to lift his head with one hand when you're rinsing his upper neck so you don't accidentally get soap running into his ears or eyes.

Conditioner is the same routine as the shampooing.

Don't know if that's any help!

Source: How Long Should Bathing a Dog Take?

FunnyDogsVideos.com

Posted in Pet Care Articles | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment